Courses

NOTE: All History of Art & Architecture courses use the prefix ARTHI


Crashing a History of Art & Architecture Course

The Department of History of Art & Architecture recognizes the difficulties that students face in adding courses.
The department recommends the following when trying to add a closed or full course:

  1. Do not email the instructor to determine if a wait list exists
  2. Instead, attend the first class meeting and first section meeting if applicable
  3. Let the instructor know your name, major/minor, class year (junior, senior)
  4. Sign up on the waiting list
  5. Continue to attend the lecture and discussion section if applicable
  6. Priority of enrollment and distribution of add codes are at the discretion of the instructor

If you are unable to attend the first class meeting due to religious observance, illness, or other unavoidable conflict, do contact the instructor via email. Add codes will not be distributed prior to completing this procedure.


Spring 2019 Courses    (updated 4/17/2019)

Undergraduate

6C   Art Survey III: Modern - Contemporary - Monahan
6DW   Survey: Arts of Japan and Korea - Wattles
6E   Survey: Arts of Africa, Oceania, and Native North America - Ogbechie
6L   Playful Spaces: A Cultural History of Games - White

105O   The Global Middle Ages: Visual and Cultural Encounters in the Medieval Mediterranean - Badamo
105P   Introduction to Medieval Art and Architecture: Soaring Cathedrals and Stunning Visions - Badamo
107C   Renaissance Kunst- and Wunderkammern: The First Museums - Travers
107D   Puzzles and Vexations: Games in Early-Modern Art and Culture - Faust
117F   Impressionism and Post-Impressionism - Garfinkle
121B   Reconstruction, Renaissance, and Realism in American Art: 1860 - 1900 - Garfinkle
121E   Three-Dimensional Arts of the United States: Meaning, Context, Reception - Garfinkle
130C   The Arts of Spain and New Spain - Engel   [CANCELLED]
130D   Pre-Columbian Art of South America - Engel   [CANCELLED]
132I   Art of Empire - Khoury
134E   The Art of the Chinese Landscape - Kim
136J   Landscape of Colonialism - Chattopadhyay
136Q   Deviant Domesticities - White
141D   Birth of the Modern Museum - Paul
143F   Exploring the Holdings of the ADC - Baciu
186E   Seminar in Fifteenth and Sixteenth Century Northern European Art: Eccentric Image - Faust
186F   Seminar in Fifteenth and Sixteenth Century Southern Renaissance: Body and Religion in Late Medieval and Renaissance Italy - Gilmore
186Q   Seminar in Islamic Art and Architecture - Khoury
187W   Coming Home: The House Museum as Cultural Encounter - White

Graduate

251B   Topics in African Arts in Context - Ogbechie
265   Topics in Architectural History & Urbanism - Chattopadhyay


6C   Art Survey III: Modern - Contemporary     TR   1230-145   LOTTE LEHMANN CONCERT HALL     Monahan

History of Western art from the eighteenth century to the present.

GE: AREA E, AREA F, EUROPEAN TRADITIONS, WRITING
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION
     HONORS SECTION:  T   200-250   ARTS 1332

Course Website (via GauchoSpace )

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6DW   Survey: Arts of Japan and Korea     TR   200-315   HSSB 1174     Wattles

Surveys the arts of Japan and the Korean peninsula from pre-historic to contemporary times. The focus is on the evolving role of the artist within society.

GE: AREA F, WORLD CULTURES, WRITING
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION

Course Website (via GauchoSpace )

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6E   Survey: Arts of Africa, Oceania, and Native North America     MW   930-1045   HSSB 1174     Ogbechie

This course provides a general introduction to the indigenous and contemporary arts of Africa, Oceania, and Native North America. In these vast locales of human culture, we will study how art provides concrete conceptual and visual structures around which social, political, cultural aesthetic and ritual institutions are constructed. The art object, imbued with several meanings, is essential to the human lifecycle, charged with political, economic and spiritual connotations and instrumental to rituals of birth, death and all the stages of transition in between. In such contexts, art operates within spaces of performance and individual art objects are imbued with multiple meanings. We will investigate the historical nature of different art traditions in these cultures and evaluate specific art forms like painting, sculpture, mural painting, textiles and decorative arts, body adornment, masquerade performances, royal/leadership arts, and sacred, secular and vernacular architecture.

GE: AREA F, WORLD CULTURES
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION

Course Website (via GauchoSpace )

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6L   Playful Spaces: A Cultural History of Games     MW   1230-145   LBL 1001     White

This course introduces students to the history of games. It is organized chronologically as a global survey. We study games and the social, political,and economic conditions that support them, as well as the interface between the human player and the imagined world of the game. Taking as its premise that games are artifacts of culture, this course focuses on the visual and spatial practice of games in social context.

GE: AREA E, AREA F, WRITING
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION

Course Website (via GauchoSpace )

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105O   The Global Middle Ages: Visual and Cultural Encounters in the Medieval Mediterranean     MW   200-315   ARTS 1341     Badamo

Prerequisite: upper-division standing.

Focusing on the Mediterranean, this course considers visual manifestations of exchange. Its goal is to examine the complexity of religious, political, and visual interactions in the Middle Ages, a period that brought together diverse religious communities, generating both social frictions and new cultural forms. Students will study the dynamic interplay among Christian, Jewish, and Islamic visual cultures as they developed and coalesced through commerce, gift exchange, the reinterpretation of pre-existing forms, and the reuse of objects and spaces.

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105P   Introduction to Medieval Art and Architecture     MW   1100-1215   ARTS 1332     Badamo
     Topic: Soaring Cathedrals and Stunning Visions

Prerequisite: upper-division standing.
For Spring 2019, enrollment by department invitation only during Pass 1; remaining seats offered during Pass 2. Qualifies for Letters & Science Honors credit.

This course explores the soaring cathedrals, monstrous sculptures, and marvelous images that inspired The Lord of the Rings, Game of Thrones, and tales of King Arthur. Beginning with the fourth-century rise of Christian images and ending with the advent of print, it traces how images and architecture developed new roles—and reinvented old ones—over the course of the Middle Ages. Investigating architecture, sculpture, and manuscripts in their historical contexts, it asks why medieval objects look the way they do and how viewers saw them. We will also devote significant time to the continuities left to us from the Middle Ages that inform our own cultural production. Through our examination of medieval and contemporary cultural production, we will develop a critical approach to the way we think about—and use—the medieval past.

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107C   Renaissance Kunst- and Wunderkammern: The First Museums     MW   330-445   ARTS 1341     Travers

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

In the sixteenth century, wealthy merchants and powerful princes in Europe began assembling vast collections that aspired to contain all possible knowledge of all possible things. From these remarkably diverse collections—called Kunst- and Wunderkammern (German), studioli (Italian), and curiosity cabinets (English)—arose our modern museums of art, science, history and technology, as well as modern research collections in universities. This course explores these fascinating collections, the purposes that they served and the circumstances in which they were created.

Course Website (via GauchoSpace )

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107D   Puzzles and Vexations: Games in Early-Modern Art and Culture     MW   1230-145   ARTS 1341     Faust

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

Explores the fascinating profusion of games in early-modern Europe, ca. 1400-1700, including card games, board games, and visual, mechanical and mathematical puzzles. Topics include the role of fate and chance; the phenomenon of puzzle pictures; illusionism and other eccentric images; and the social and moral implications of games.

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117F   Impressionism and Post-Impressionism      MW   200-315   HSSB 1174     Garfinkle

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

Impressionist and Post-Impressionist movement in France from 1863 through the first decade of the twentieth century and the advent of Cubism. Includes the work of Monet, Manet, Degas, Renoir, Pissarro, Van Gogh, Cezanne, Gauguin, and Seurat.

GE: AREA F

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121B   Reconstruction, Renaissance, and Realism in American Art: 1860 - 1900     TR   330-445   ARTS 1341     Garfinkle

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

Painting within the context of the human-made environment, from the onset of the Civil War to just before World War I, tracing the role of art in the rise of modern, corporate and industrial America.

GE: AREA F

Course Website (via GauchoSpace )

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121E   Three-Dimensional Arts of the United States: Meaning, Context, Reception     TR   1230-145   ARTS 1341     Garfinkle

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

From Puritan gravestones to park fountains to war memorials, American sculpture has been a barometer of the political, cultural, religious and artistic trends of our society. This course covers the carvings of the first settlements, figural sculpture of colonial America, various art movements and sculptural forms from the nineteenth to twenty-first centuries as well as the current controversies surrounding public art.

GE: AREA F

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130C   The Arts of Spain and New Spain     TR   200-315   ARTS 1341     Engel

   [CANCELLED]

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130D   Pre-Columbian Art of South America     TR   330-445   ARTS 1341     Engel

   [CANCELLED]

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132I   Art of Empire     TR   1100-1215   ARTS 1341     Khoury

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

Studies the visual culture of different empires, alone or in a comparative fashion. For example, Ottoman and Hapsburg; Ottoman, Safavid, and Mughal; Mughal and British India; or the earlier empire of the Fatimids, Abbasids, and Umayyads of Syria and Spain.

GE: AREA F

Course Website (via GauchoSpace )

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134E   The Art of the Chinese Landscape     TR   500-615   ARTS 1341     Kim

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

Chinese approaches to landscape as subject matter in art, with a focus on painting and garden architecture. The course begins with the immortality cult in the Han dynasty (206 BCE - CE 221) and ends with contemporary artists of the twentieth century.

GE: AREA F, WORLD CULTURES

Course Website (via GauchoSpace )

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136J   Landscape of Colonialism      TR   930-1045   ARTS 1341     Chattopadhyay

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

Examination of architecture, urbanism and the land scape of British and French colonialism between 1600 and 1950. Introduction to the different forms of colonialism, colonial ideology and the architecture of colonial encounter in North America, Asia, Africa and Australia.

GE: AREA F, WORLD CULTURES

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136Q   Deviant Domesticities      TR   200-315   ARTS 1341     White

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

We take the suburban landscape and its module of the single-family detached house for granted, as though it was somehow a "natural" landscape form, unmindful of its laborious two hundred year invention. It is a landscape pattern that now poses an acute challenge to ecological and economic sustainability. This course is premised on the notion that we can't hope to unravel this complex problem without both a historical and an architectural analysis.

The architecture profession in the United States has embraced the need for a "green," or sustainable, architecture, but its concern has mainly been technological. Can the concept of "green" apply to family and community structure, and not just to the construction of buildings? The suburban low-density landscape has long been cited as un-green, but what are the dense alternatives? In this course we shall ponder "green" implications at the scale of home and community, and our primary subject of study will be the suburban landscape and its many deviations, including Isla Vista.

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141D   Birth of the Modern Museum     MW   1100-1215   ARTS 1341     Paul

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

Course examines the emergence and development of museums of art in eighteenth-century Europe, tracing their origins to the private collections from which they evolved and studying the practices, such as tourism, that stimulated their growth.

GE: AREA F

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143F     Exploring the Holdings of the ADC     MW   200-315   ARTS 1332     Baciu

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

The course is developed in co-operation with the Architecture & Design Collection (ADC) and marks the inauguration of HAA’s new vault for archival studies. As such, it is not only designed to give an introduction to archival research, but also highlight the differences between the physical and the virtual. The museum holdings dedicated to the work of the architects R.M. Schindler and Cliff May will accompany us on the quest of understanding the difference between the material qualities of the architect’s work and their impact on culture at large.

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186E   Seminar in Fifteenth and Sixteenth Century Northern European Art     M   300-550   ARTS 2622     Faust
     Topic: Eccentric Image

Prerequisite: upper-division standing.
May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 8 units with different topic. Open only to History of Art & Architecture majors during Pass 1.

Anthropomorphic landscapes, anamorphic and composite portraits, pictorial stones, and trompe l’œil paintings of early-modern Europe (ca. 1400–1800) present perceptual and conceptual challenges. Some images are not what they appear to be; others appear to be what they are not or change before the eyes. Approaching such eccentric images according to their historical reception and the tasks they offer to viewing subjects, this seminar explores questions concerning cognition, artifice, and human and divine creativity. Confronting labels such as curiosities, caprices, and optical toys, we will examine these images’ engagement with contemporary notions of paradox and mutable forms. Course readings emphasize early-modern objects, but students are welcome to address images produced in other cultures and eras.

GE: WRITING

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186F   Seminar in Fifteenth and Sixteenth Century Southern Renaissance     TR   1100-1215   ARTS 1332     Gilmore
     Topic: Body and Religion in Late Medieval and Renaissance Italy

Prerequisite: upper-division standing.
May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 8 units with different topic. Open only to History of Art & Architecture majors during Pass 1.

Bleeding crucifixes. Weeping and sweating paintings. Sweet-smelling saintly bones. This course will examine these intersections and others that occurred between the body, material culture, and religious practices in late medieval and Renaissance Italy. Students will study the performances and forms of sensory engagement that surrounded religious objects and enlivened sacred spaces. They will also consider the representation and marginalization of the bodies of the disenfranchised. The course surveys a wide range of objects and monuments that people encountered on an intimate level: miraculous images, reliquaries, votive offerings, dioramas, pilgrimage sites, and painted panels used to comfort prisoners.

GE: WRITING

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186Q   Seminar in Islamic Art and Architecture     R   200-450   ARTS 2622     Khoury

Prerequisite: upper-division standing.
May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 8 units with different topic. Open only to History of Art & Architecture majors during Pass 1.

Advanced studies in Islamic art and architecture. Topics will vary. This course requires weekly readings and discussion, and the writing of a research seminar paper.

GE: WRITING

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187W   Coming Home: The House Museum as Cultural Encounter     M   800-1050   ARTS 1332     White

Prerequisite: upper-division standing; designed for majors.
Open only to History of Art & Architecture majors during Pass 1.

This seminar studies the political and cultural history of the house museum in the United States, from its antebellum beginnings in the nineteenth century to the present. Explores a variety of issues related to the house museum, including curatorial and design choices, visitor experiences, and the House Museum Movement.

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251B   Topics in African Arts in Context     T   300-550   ARTS 2622     Ogbechie

Prerequisite: graduate standing.

Special research in the contextual history of African art.

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265   Topics in Architectural History & Urbanism     W   900-1150   ARTS 2622     Chattopadhyay

Prerequisite: graduate standing.

Special research in the history of architecture.

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