Courses

NOTE: All History of Art & Architecture courses use the prefix ARTHI


Crashing a History of Art & Architecture Course

The Department of History of Art & Architecture recognizes the difficulties that students face in adding courses and recommends the following when trying to add a closed or full course:

  1. Please do NOT email the instructor to see if there is a waiting list. Instead, sign up on the waiting list on GOLD
    • Make sure to fill out your name, major/minor, and class year (e.g., third year, fourth year)
    • Please note that the enrollment availability listed on GOLD might not accurately reflect the latest enrollment for the course
    • NOTE: if you are trying to crash ARTHI 6L, please contact the instructor rather than attend in-person lectures and sections
  2. Attend and participate in all lecture and section (if applicable) meetings and assignments for the first week, both synchronous and asynchronous
    • If you are unable to attend a class and/or section meeting due to religious observance, illness, or other unavoidable conflict, do contact the instructor via email
  3. If you haven't been admitted to the course prior to the first class, also try joining the GauchoSpace course site, if a page exists, as another way to follow the first week of class
    • NOTE: Even if you are able to join the GauchoSpace site, this does not mean you are officially enrolled in the course. You must be registered on GOLD to receive credit for the course
  4. Continue attending lectures and discussion sections until you receive admission
    • Priority of enrollment and distribution of add codes are at the discretion of the instructor. Generally speaking, priority is given to those who participate in lectures and discussion sections - please note crashing protocol may vary by instructor

Add codes will not be distributed prior to completing this procedure.


Fall 2021 Courses     (updated 9/22/2021)

Undergraduate

6B   Art Survey II: Renaissance - Baroque - Adams
6F   Survey: Architecture and Planning - Wittman
6K   Survey: Islamic Art & Architecture - Vilander
6L   Playful Spaces: A Cultural History of Games - White

115E    The Grand Tour: Experiencing Italy in the Eighteenth Century - Paul
119B   Contemporary Art - Griffith
121D   African American Art and the African Legacy - Ogbechie
127A   African Art I - Ogbechie
131CM   Art of Colonial Mexico - Caplan
131MM   Mexican Manuscripts - Caplan
134C   Chinese Painting I - Sturman
136O   Sustainable Architecture: History and Aesthetics - Welter   [cross-listed with ENV S 136O]
137GA   Architecture and Theory in Germany and Austria (1770-1870) - Wittman   [CANCELLED]
186H   Seminar in Seventeenth Century Southern European Art - Paul
186L   Seminar in Art of the Americas - Boswell
186SV/267   Seminar in Modern Architecture - Welter

Graduate

255A   Topics in Renaissance Art: Art, Science, and Colonialism, 1450-1700 - Lumbreras
267/186SV   Topics in Modern Architecture - Welter


6B   Art Survey II: Renaissance - Baroque     TR   930-1045   HYBRID: ONE WEEKLY ON-CAMPUS MEETING   (T   930-1045   IV THEATER 1) ; ONE WEEKLY ONLINE ASYNCHRONOUS LECTURE     Adams

A survey of Renaissance and Baroque art in northern and southern Europe.

GE: AREA E, AREA F, EUROPEAN TRADITIONS, WRITING
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION - NOTE: SECTIONS TAUGHT ON CAMPUS

Course Website

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6F   Survey: Architecture and Planning     TR   1230-145   HYBRID: ONE WEEKLY ON-CAMPUS MEETING   (T   1230-145   BUCHANAN 1940) ; ONE WEEKLY ONLINE ASYNCHRONOUS LECTURE     Wittman

This course offers a wide-ranging introduction to architecture and urban design from the earliest human constructions to the middle of the 20th century. The focus is decidedly global in the first half of the course, and more European in the second half. Students will encounter a variety of buildings and cities, but also different ways of understanding and studying them. Student writing assignments will involve the analysis of local architecture and town planning.

GE: AREA F, WRITING
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION - NOTE: SECTIONS TAUGHT ON CAMPUS

Course Website

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6K   Survey: Islamic Art & Architecture     MW   330-445   BUCHANAN 1940     Vilander

A survey of Islamic art and architecture.

GE: AREA F, WORLD CULTURES, WRITING
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION - NOTE: SECTIONS TAUGHT ON CAMPUS

Course Website

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6L   Playful Spaces: A Cultural History of Games     TR   200-315   HYBRID: ONE WEEKLY ON-CAMPUS MEETING   (T   200-315   EMBARCADERO HALL) ; ONE WEEKLY ONLINE ASYNCHRONOUS LECTURE     White

This course introduces students to the history of games. It is organized chronologically as a global survey. We study games and the social, political,and economic conditions that support them, as well as the interface between the human player and the imagined world of the game. Taking as its premise that games are artifacts of culture, this course focuses on the visual and spatial practice of games in social context.

GE: AREA E, AREA F, WRITING
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION - NOTE: SECTIONS TAUGHT ON CAMPUS

Course Website (via GauchoSpace Link opens in a new window)

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115E   The Grand Tour: Experiencing Italy in the Eighteenth Century     MW   1100-1215   ARTS 1341     Paul

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

In the eighteenth century, Italy was a mecca for European travelers who sought to enjoy its culture, diversions, landscape, and society. This course will examine the multifaceted experiences of these travelers and the ways in which they constitute the beginnings of the phenomenon of modern tourism.

GE: AREA E

Course Website (via GauchoSpace Link opens in a new window)

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119B   Contemporary Art     TR   200-315   ARTS 1341     Griffith

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

Study of recent artistic developments, from pop to contemporary movements in painting, sculpture, and photography. Movements studied include minimal art, post‐minimalism, process art, conceptual art, earthworks, pluralism, neoexpressionism, and issues of postmodern art and criticism.

GE: AREA F

Course Website

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121D   African American Art and the African Legacy     MW   1230-145   ARTS 1341    Ogbechie

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

This course examines the intersection of art, race, and identity in African-American arts and visual culture. It investigates the impact of an African legacy on African American identity, the role of race in the constitution of art narratives, the politics of representation in art, the constitution of social and cultural space, and notions of Diaspora identities in African-American art. It also analyzes key artists and discusses issues of gender and social class. Genres to be covered include Painting, Sculpture, Folk art, Film, Photography, Installation art, and Performance.

GE: AREA F, ETHNICITY

Course Website (via GauchoSpace Link opens in a new window)

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127A   African Art I     MW   930-1045   ARTS 1341     Ogbechie

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

This course provides an introduction to African art through analysis of African cultures and symbol systems. It evaluates African art in relation to the history and diversity of the continent and also in relation to perceptions and representations of Africa from antiquity to the contemporary era. Types of arts discussed include painting, sculpture, textiles and body adornment, ceramics, performance, and contemporary African art.

GE: AREA F, WORLD CULTURES

Course Website (via GauchoSpace Link opens in a new window)

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131CM   Art of Colonial Mexico     TR   330-445   HYBRID: ONE WEEKLY ON-CAMPUS MEETING   (T   330-445   TD-WEST 2600) ; ONE WEEKLY ONLINE ASYNCHRONOUS LECTURE     Caplan

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

This advanced survey explores the art of colonial Mexico, or New Spain, from the 16th through 18th centuries and focuses on art and architecture's role in forming a colonial society. We will discuss Indigenous experiences of colonialism and forms of resistance as well as how manuscripts, architecture, paintings, maps, featherworks, and public festivals constructed ideas of place, colonial society, and social identity.

Course Website (via GauchoSpace Link opens in a new window)

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131MM   Mexican Manuscripts     TR   1230-145   HYBRID: ONE WEEKLY ON-CAMPUS MEETING   (T   1230-145   ARTS 1341) ; ONE WEEKLY ONLINE ASYNCHRONOUS LECTURE     Caplan

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

This upper division lecture surveys the manuscript traditions of 15th- and 16th-century Mexico, including Nahua (Aztec), Mixtec, and Maya codices. Through this course, we will explore the importance of books and writing in Mesoamerica; the place of histories, maps, and divinatory almanacs in Mesoamerican thought and society; and the role of Indigenous and European book traditions in shaping the colonial encounter.

Course Website (via GauchoSpace Link opens in a new window)

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134C   Chinese Painting I     MW   200-315   HYBRID: ONE WEEKLY ON-CAMPUS MEETING   (W   200-315   HSSB 1174) ; ONLINE ASYNCHRONOUS LECTURES     Sturman

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.
Recommended Preparation: ARTHI 6DS.

A selective survey of major masters, monuments, techniques, and aesthetics of Chinese painting, from the Han to Qing dynasties, with additional emphasis on socio-economic factors and historical contexts. Among the major topics for study and discussion are notions of the “human,” the values of nature and landscape, imperial patronage, the emergence of scholar painting, and word-image relationships. The course will be taught as a combination of online asynchronous short lectures and synchronous group meetings that will involve student presentations, discussion of readings, and close visual analysis. Final grades will be based on a final paper, student participation, and reading comprehension tests. Please contact Professor Sturman if you have questions: sturman@ucsb.edu.

GE: AREA F, WORLD CULTURES

Course Website

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136O   Sustainable Architecture: History and Aesthetics     MW   930-1045   BUCHANAN 1940     Welter
[cross-listed with ENV S 136O]

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

The course examines the history, theory, and aesthetics of sustainable architecture as it developed from approximately the early twentieth century onwards. Emphasis is placed on the critical analysis of changing historical and theoretical approaches to environmentally sound building practices. We will also discuss whether there is (or should be) a distinct 'green' or 'sustainable' architectural aesthetic.

The scope of the course is global, though concepts of sustainable architecture have historically been developed in the Western world, the latter will be prominently represented in this historically oriented course.

GE: AREA F

Course Website (via GauchoSpace Link opens in a new window)

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137GA   Architecture and Theory in Germany and Austria (1770-1870)     TR   330-445     Wittman

   [CANCELLED]

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186H   Seminar in Seventeenth Century Southern European Art      R   200-450   ARTS 2622     Paul

Prerequisite: upper-division standing.
May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 8 units.

Advanced studies in seventeenth century art. Topics will vary. Requires weekly readings and discussion, and the writing of a research seminar paper.

GE: WRITING

Course Website (via GauchoSpace Link opens in a new window)

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186L   Seminar in Art of the Americas     T   930-1200   ARTS 1245     Boswell

Prerequisite: upper-division standing.
May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 8 units.

Advanced studies in the art of the Americas. Topics will vary. This course requires weekly readings and discussion, and the writing of a research seminar paper.

Course Website

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186SV/267   Seminar in Modern Architecture     M   1200-250   ARTS 1245     Welter

Prerequisite: upper-division standing.
May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 8 units.

Advanced studies in modern architecture. Topics will vary. This course requires weekly readings and discussion, and the writing of a research seminar paper.

GE: WRITING

Course Website (via GauchoSpace Link opens in a new window)

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255A   Topics in Renaissance Art     W   900-1150   ARTS 2622     Lumbreras
     Topic: Art, Science, and Colonialism, 1450-1700

Prerequisite: graduate standing.

This graduate seminar explores the relationship between art and science in the early modern period from the perspective of empire formation and the beginnings of colonialism. With a focus on the Iberian world, we will examine the technologies, infrastructures, and forms of knowledge that facilitated the European quest for natural resources and enforced labor, and consider the complex visual and material cultures that emerged from them. Some of the themes that we will be looking at include cartography, physiognomy & race, climate, demonology, and materiality. The seminar is conceived in part as a writing workshop. Thus we will also explore together the kinds of scholarship this material might invite.

Course Website

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267/186SV   Topics in Modern Architecture     M   1200-250   ARTS 1245     Welter

Prerequisite: graduate standing.

Special research in modern architecture.

Course Website (via GauchoSpace Link opens in a new window)

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