Courses

NOTE: All History of Art & Architecture courses use the prefix ARTHI


Crashing a History of Art & Architecture Course

The Department of History of Art & Architecture recognizes the difficulties that students face in adding courses.
The department recommends the following when trying to add a closed or full course:

  1. Do not email the instructor to determine if a wait list exists
  2. Instead, attend the first class meeting and first section meeting if applicable
  3. Let the instructor know your name, major/minor, class year (junior, senior)
  4. Sign up on the waiting list
  5. Continue to attend the lecture and discussion section if applicable
  6. Priority of enrollment and distribution of add codes are at the discretion of the instructor

If you are unable to attend the first class meeting due to religious observance, illness, or other unavoidable conflict, do contact the instructor via email. Add codes will not be distributed prior to completing this procedure.


Winter 2020 Courses     (updated 1/17/2020)

Undergraduate

1   Introduction to Art - Paul
5B   Introduction to Museum Studies - Sorkin
6B   Art Survey II: Renaissance - Baroque - Faust
6H   Survey: Arts of the Ancient Americas - Boswell
6J   Survey: Contemporary Architecture - White

111C   Dutch Art in the Age of Vermeer. The Golden Age: 1648 - 1672 - Adams
117B   Nineteenth-Century Art: Architecture & Theory in Germany/Austria (1770–1871) - diZerega
117F   Impressionism and Post-Impressionism - Garfinkle
121C   Twentieth-Century American Art: Modernism and Pluralism, 1900 - Present - Sanderson
121D   African American Art and the African Legacy - Ogbechie
134J   Understanding Manga - Wattles   [cross-listed with JAPAN 134J]
136W   Introduction to 2D/3D Visualizations in Architecture - White   [cross-listed with ART 106W]
136Y   Modern Architecture in Southern California, c. 1890s to the Present - Welter
141G   The Architecture of Museums and Galleries from c. 1800 to the Present - Welter
143E   Adaptive Reuse and Art - Baciu
186B/252B   Seminar in Ancient Greek & Roman Art/Architecture: Materiality of Religion - Moser
186N   Seminar in African Art: Modernisms in Global Africa - Ogbechie
186RW/282B   Seminar in Japanese Art: Art of Unwantedness: Incarcerated / Displaced / In Limbo - Wattles

Graduate

200A   Proseminar: Introduction to Art-Historical Methods - Chattopadhyay
252B/186B   Topics in Roman Architecture and Urbanism: Materiality of Religion - Moser
282B/186RW   Topics in Japanese Art: Art of Unwantedness: Incarcerated / Displaced / In Limbo - Wattles
297   Getty Graduate Consortium: Art and Ecology


1   Introduction to Art     MW   200-315   EMBARCADERO HALL     Paul

This course is intended for students who have not taken classes in the History of Art and Architecture, and may or may not do so again. It is designed to develop basic visual skills and introduce students to the wide range of issues, works, and themes with which the History of Art and Architecture is engaged, varying from year to year. NOTE: Not open to History of Art & Architecture majors.

GE: AREA F
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION
     HONORS SECTION:   W   1100-1150    ARTS 2622

Course Website

top


5B   Introduction to Museum Studies     MW   1100-1215   HSSB 1174     Sorkin

Designed to introduce students to various aspects of Museum Studies — historical, theoretical, and practical — by examining a range of issues and topics with which the field is engaged.

GE: AREA F
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION

Course Website (via GauchoSpace )

top


6B   Art Survey II: Renaissance - Baroque     TR   1230-145   LOTTE LEHMANN CONCERT HALL     Faust

A survey of Renaissance and Baroque art in northern and southern Europe.

GE: AREA E, AREA F, EUROPEAN TRADITIONS, WRITING
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION
     HONORS SECTION:   W   200-250    ARTS 1332

Course Website (via GauchoSpace )

top


6H   Survey: Arts of the Ancient Americas     MW   930-1045   HSSB 1174     Boswell

Visual Culture or "Art," that is to say architecture, sculpture and mural painting as well as textiles, metallurgy and ceramics, played a central and powerful role within the Precolumbian civilizations that produced them. Visual messages were encoded in the ways cities were built, stone and wood were carved, and leaders had themselves ornamented and buried. Using interdisciplinary methods, our goal will be to reconstruct (to the degree that is possible), the meaning and function of the visual arts in multiple, interlocking economic, political and sacred spheres. As an introduction to the ancient Americas, this course will focus on seven major cultures in Mesoamerica (Olmec, Teotihuacan, Maya, Aztec) and Andean South America (Chavín, Moche, and Inka).

GE: AREA F, WORLD CULTURES, WRITING
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION

Course Website (via GauchoSpace )

top


6J   Survey: Contemporary Architecture     MW   1230-145   HSSB 1174     White

Global survey of architectural production in the twenty-first century. Emphasis on form and technology, as well as economic, sociopolitical context. Explores built form at a variety of scales (buildings, cities, virtual spaces) as well as the concept of a "contemporary."

GE: AREA F
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION

Course Website (via GauchoSpace )

top


111C   Dutch Art in the Age of Vermeer. The Golden Age: 1648 - 1672     TR   330-445   ARTS 1341     Adams

Prerequisite: one History of Art & Architecture course or equivalent. Not open to freshmen.

This class covers art produced during the second half of the seventeenth century in Holland. This was the period from the recognition of the Northern Netherlands as an independent nation in 1648 to the end of the so-called “Golden Age” with the invasion of the Lowlands by France in 1672. The era witnessed the flowering of a Protestant mercantile culture which rivaled the political and economic power of that of monarchs and aristocrats across Europe. These men and women supported such artists as Rembrandt van Rijn and Jan Vermeer as well as a host of lesser known masters who created images rooted everyday life. This course examines the cultural functions of this rich, apparently descriptive imagery as it helped to form the private identities and public ambitions of Europe's first middle-class capitalist society. We examine the aesthetics and content of this imagery through contemporary economic, historic, religious, and literary developments, and the emerging scientific revolution.

The emphasis in this class is upon the social and intellectual issues engaged by Dutch painting: how they participated in the struggle between the values of a new middle-class and capitalist culture in conflict with an older way of life. At the same time, it examines the varieties of art historical methods employed by contemporary scholars, as well as those of the past, to understand these images. The goal of the course is to give students a solid grounding in knowledge about seventeenth century Dutch art and culture, with a focus upon critical analysis of images as well as the structure of arguments that have been made about them. These skills are intended to be ones that you may be able to apply both in other courses, as well as information you encounter and arguments you construct in your daily life.

GE: AREA F

Course Website (via GauchoSpace )

top


117B   Nineteenth-Century Art     TR   200-315   ARTS 1341     diZerega
     Topic: Architecture & Theory in Germany/Austria (1770-1871)

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

Focusing on Berlin, Munich, and  Vienna, this course examines architecture, architectural thought and theory, and town planning in the German-speaking lands of Europe during the century of geopolitical change between the lead-up to the French Revolution of 1789 and the creation of the German Empire in 1871.  We will investigate the age’s burning architectural question: “In which style shall we build?” Style debates engaged architects, poets, politicians, and communities, as large segments of German society deliberated how the language of architectural form—Ancient Greek? Gothic? A new style?—might give voice to longed-for notions of a timeless German cultural identity, yet also herald the arrival of buildings and cities to serve new conditions in their industrializing, changing world.

GE: AREA F

Course Website (via GauchoSpace )

top


117F   Impressionism and Post-Impressionism      MW   1230-145   ARTS 1341     Garfinkle

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

Impressionist and Post-Impressionist movement in France from 1863 through the first decade of the twentieth century and the advent of Cubism. Includes the work of Monet, Manet, Degas, Renoir, Pissarro, Van Gogh, Cezanne, Gauguin, and Seurat.

GE: AREA F

Course Website (via GauchoSpace )

top


121C   Twentieth-Century American Art: Modernism and Pluralism, 1900 - Present     TR   1230-145   ARTS 1341     Sanderson

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

American painting in the twentieth-century, from the advent of modernism to yesterday.

GE: AREA F, AMERICAN HISTORY AND INSTITUTIONS

Course Website (via GauchoSpace )

top


121D   African American Art and the African Legacy     TR   930-1045   ARTS 1341     Ogbechie

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

This course examines the intersection of art, race, and identity in African-American arts and visual culture. It investigates the impact of an African legacy on African American identity, the role of race in the constitution of art narratives, the politics of representation in art, the constitution of social and cultural space, and notions of Diaspora identities in African-American art. It also analyzes key artists and discusses issues of gender and social class. Genres to be covered include Painting, Sculpture, Folk art, Film, Photography, Installation art, and Performance.

GE: AREA F, ETHNICITY

Course Website (via GauchoSpace )

top


134J   Understanding Manga     MW   930-1045   ARTS 1341     Wattles
[cross-listed with JAPAN 134J]

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen. Open only to History of Art & Architecture majors during Pass 1.

This class will do close readings of manga (cartoons/comics/graphic novels by Japanese), considering examples from the 19th century to the present. We will analyze the visual design, narrative progression, and the word and image relationship. Historically, we will think about the shifting definition of manga through time and consider how politics, changing media, and globalization played a role in determining the form. Student discussion, presentations, and a paper required.

Previous knowledge of manga is welcomed (or more broadly Japan and Japanese).

Course Website (via GauchoSpace )

top


136W   Introduction to 2D/3D Visualizations in Architecture     MW   800-1050   TD-WEST 1530    White
[cross-listed with ART 106W]

Prerequisite: upper-division standing; open to majors only.

Develops skills in reading, interpreting, and visualizing 3D objects and spaces by offering excercises in sketching, perspective, orthographic projections, isometric drawings, ad manual rendering practices. Relevant for thse interested in history of architecture, sculpture, and such spatial practices as installations and public art.

GE: AREA F

Course Website (via GauchoSpace )

top


136Y   Modern Architecture in Southern California, c. 1890s to the Present     MW   1100-1215   ARTS 1341     Welter

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

Critically analyzes the changing definitions of modern architecture in Southern California from the 1890s to the present, focusing on the work of architects like Greene and Greene, R.M. Schindler, and R. Neutra, as well as the Case Study Houses.

GE: AREA F

Course Website (via GauchoSpace )

top


141G   The Architecture of Museums and Galleries from c. 1800 to the Present     MW   200-315   ARTS 1341     Welter

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

Discusses the history of museums and galleries as distinct modern building types by analyzing their architectural developments from approximately 1800 to the present. Beside architectural design issues (sequence of galleries, display of exhibits, lighting, visitor routes, etc.), the course analyzes museums as sites of memory, their intersections with the modern city, and their roles in cultural and societal debates. Geographically, the course focuses on both the museum’s origin in Europe and its contemporary universal presence.

GE: AREA F, EUROPEAN TRADITIONS, WRITING

Course Website (via GauchoSpace )

top


143E     Adaptive Reuse and Art    F   1000-1250   ARTS 1332     Baciu

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

In Santa Barbara, the SBMA is currently being remodeled. The present construction work will be completed next year. In New York, the MoMA has just reopened. These architectural projects are part of a larger story. Museums often rethink their identities and transform their buildings. Strictly speaking, every exhibition transforms a museum building, making museums among the most changing type of buildings. This course traces and explains this story in its cultural context. Nowhere is art as powerful as in the middle of its audiences, and nowhere are the effects as palpable as on the buildings and built environments that it transforms. The present iteration of Adaptive Reuse and Art will focus in particular on the SBMA, with the aim of having each student contribute a short text to a joint booklet, to be published coinciding with the inauguration of the remodeled SBMA.

Course Website (via GauchoSpace )

top


186B/252B   Seminar in Ancient Greek & Roman Art/Architecture     T   900-1150   ARTS 1245     Moser
     Topic: Materiality of Religion

Prerequisite: upper-division standing.
May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 8 units with different topic. Open only to History of Art & Architecture majors during Pass 1.

What can material culture tell us about the practice and lived experience of ritual? How are religious activities influenced by, for example, sanctuary architecture, votive offerings, or animal sacrifice? This course will answer these and related questions as we move, week by week, through more general themes in the study of the materiality of religion: votives, sacrifice,  sanctuary architecture, religious statues, magic, foreign influences, and funerary practices. Within each of these larger themes, we will continually question the extent to which the material objects used in ritual, the settings in which ritual occurred, and the physical remains of ritual practice actually informed and shaped the religious activities themselves. Through such an exploration, we will challenge the very categories of “material” and of “religion,” and test the virtues and limitations of using archaeology as a tool for the study of ritual.

GE: WRITING

Course Website (via GauchoSpace )

top


186N   Seminar in African Art     T   300-550   ARTS 2622     Ogbechie
     Topic: Modernisms in Global Africa

Prerequisite: upper-division standing.
May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 8 units with different topic. Open only to History of Art & Architecture majors during Pass 1.

When (and where and why) was modernism? This seminar will engage with the emergent art historical, methodological, and theoretical literature shaping the history of modern art after the global turn with a special focus on global African responses to modern art. What are the principal frameworks through which African and African Diaspora artists, actors, and institutions engaged questions of modernity in art? We will review case studies of important art movements as well as key modern artists in African, African American, Black British and Caribbean art alongside discussion of key exhibitions and institutions. Click here to download the seminar flyer.

GE: WRITING

Course Website (via GauchoSpace )

top


186RW/282B   Seminar in Japanese Art     W   1200-250   ARTS 2622     Wattles
     Topic: Art of Unwantedness: Incarcerated / Displaced / In Limbo

Prerequisite: upper-division standing.
Same course as JAPAN 186RW.

This seminar explores various visual and literary depictions done worldwide by and of incarcerated persons from the mid 19th century to the present. From works done by those in prison for crimes such as fraud, robbery, or murder, to those incarcerated for reasons related to ethnicity, sexuality, or gender, to those jailed for political causes and those interned for attempting to migrate, we differentiate what is done by those actually experiencing incarceration from that done by artists, writers, or filmmakers who observe, research, record, or imagine the experience. While reading to understand historical context, we will weigh theoretical vocabulary from Goffman, Foucault, Agamben, and Coates to explore how punishment and incarceration can be alternatively defined and articulated. We cover all media including comics, with some emphasis on the Japanese and Japanese-American experience and will have guest lectures from those experienced in prison art and poetry. Our wide-range of contexts—from Kafka’s Czechoslovakia to Ōsugi’s Imperial Japan, Mirikatani’s war-time America to Behrouz Boochani’s offshore Australia and Claudio Peña’s Japan—encourage us to articulate questions about the humanizing value of creative practices as differently produced, curated, and mediated to various publics. Our approach is highly exploratory and interdisciplinary, that is, we will allow our readings and viewings to help us better frame the issues.

Contact Miriam Wattles for questions on auditing, add codes, or anything else: miriam@ucsb.edu.

GE: WRITING

Course Website (via GauchoSpace )

top


200A   Proseminar: Introduction to Art-Historical Methods     M   200-450   ARTS 1245      Chattopadhyay

Prerequisite: graduate standing.

Introduction to art-historical methods, with emphasis on the historical development of current practices, critical theory, debates within the field, and cross-disciplinary dialogues.

top


252B/186B   Topics in Roman Architecture and Urbanism     T   900-1150   ARTS 1245     Moser
     Topic: Materiality of Religion

Prerequisite: graduate standing.

What can material culture tell us about the practice and lived experience of ritual? How are religious activities influenced by, for example, sanctuary architecture, votive offerings, or animal sacrifice? This course will answer these and related questions as we move, week by week, through more general themes in the study of the materiality of religion: votives, sacrifice,  sanctuary architecture, religious statues, magic, foreign influences, and funerary practices. Within each of these larger themes, we will continually question the extent to which the material objects used in ritual, the settings in which ritual occurred, and the physical remains of ritual practice actually informed and shaped the religious activities themselves. Through such an exploration, we will challenge the very categories of “material” and of “religion,” and test the virtues and limitations of using archaeology as a tool for the study of ritual.

Course Website (via GauchoSpace )

top


282B/186RW   Topics in Japanese Art     W   1200-250   ARTS 2622     Wattles
     Topic: Art of Unwantedness: Incarcerated / Displaced / In Limbo

Prerequisite: graduate standing.

This seminar explores various visual and literary depictions done worldwide by and of incarcerated persons from the mid 19th century to the present. From works done by those in prison for crimes such as fraud, robbery, or murder, to those incarcerated for reasons related to ethnicity, sexuality, or gender, to those jailed for political causes and those interned for attempting to migrate, we differentiate what is done by those actually experiencing incarceration from that done by artists, writers, or filmmakers who observe, research, record, or imagine the experience. While reading to understand historical context, we will weigh theoretical vocabulary from Goffman, Foucault, Agamben, and Coates to explore how punishment and incarceration can be alternatively defined and articulated. We cover all media including comics, with some emphasis on the Japanese and Japanese-American experience and will have guest lectures from those experienced in prison art and poetry. Our wide-range of contexts—from Kafka’s Czechoslovakia to Ōsugi’s Imperial Japan, Mirikatani’s war-time America to Behrouz Boochani’s offshore Australia and Claudio Peña’s Japan—encourage us to articulate questions about the humanizing value of creative practices as differently produced, curated, and mediated to various publics. Our approach is highly exploratory and interdisciplinary, that is, we will allow our readings and viewings to help us better frame the issues.

Interested graduate students from any field are welcome to audit with permission. Contact Miriam Wattles for questions on auditing, add codes, or anything else: miriam@ucsb.edu.

top


297   Getty Graduate Consortium Seminar     F     1000-500   The Getty Research Institute
     Topic: Art and Ecology
     Consortium Scholar: James Nisbet, Getty Scholar and Associate Professor of Art History and Visual Studies, University of California, Irvine

Prerequisite: graduate standing; by application only (deadline: October 25, 2019).

Special graduate seminar offered at the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles, involving faculty and graduate students from the five graduate programs in Art History or Visual Studies located in southern California. For more information about the theme and application process, visit the Getty Scholars Program site and view the Consortium Seminar flyer.

F   900-500   The Getty Research Institute
     Seminars: January 10, 17, 24, 31; February 7, 21, 28; March 6, 2020

top