2021-2022 Courses - Winter

(tentative; updated 7/26/2021)

Undergraduate

5B   Introduction to Museum Studies - Paul
6E   Survey: Arts of Africa, Oceania, and Native North America - Ogbechie
6G   Survey: History of Photography - TBA
6H   Survey: Arts of the Ancient Americas - Boswell
6J   Survey: Contemporary Architecture - White

100   Methods for the History of Art and Architecture - Badamo
103D   Introduction to Classical Archaeology - Moser
105O   The Global Middle Ages: Visual and Cultural Encounters in the Medieval Mediterranean - Badamo
107A   Painting in the 15th-Century Netherlands - Meadow
107C   Renaissance Kunst- and Wunderkammern: The First Museums - Meadow
109D   Art and the Formation of Social Subjects in the Early Modern Period - Lumbreras
111C   Dutch Art in the Age of Vermeer. The Golden Age: 1648 - 1672 - Adams
134K   Chinese Calligraphy: History and Aesthetics - Sturman   [cross-listed with CHIN 134K]
136K   Modern Architecture in Early Twentieth-Century Europe - Welter
137GA   Architecture and Theory in Germany and Austria (1770-1870) - Wittman
141G   The Architecture of Museums and Galleries from c. 1800 to the Present - Welter
142D   Architecture and Planning in Rome: Napoleon to Mussolini - Wittman
163   Digital Visual Studies - TBA   [cross-listed with C LIT 163 and GER 163]
186G   Seminar in Seventeenth Century Northern European Art - Adams
187W   Coming Home: The House Museum as Cultural Encounter - White
187Z   Museum Studies Seminar - TBA

Graduate

252B   Topics in Roman Architecture and Urbanism - Moser
275E   Topics in Islamic Art - Khoury
297   Getty Graduate Consortium: The Fragment - Sorkin


5B   Introduction to Museum Studies     Paul

Designed to introduce students to various aspects of Museum Studies — historical, theoretical, and practical — by examining a range of issues and topics with which the field is engaged.

GE: AREA F
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION

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6E   Survey: Arts of Africa, Oceania, and Native North America     Ogbechie

This course provides a general introduction to the indigenous and contemporary arts of Africa, Oceania, and Native North America. In these vast locales of human culture, we will study how art provides concrete conceptual and visual structures around which social, political, cultural aesthetic and ritual institutions are constructed. The art object, imbued with several meanings, is essential to the human lifecycle, charged with political, economic and spiritual connotations and instrumental to rituals of birth, death and all the stages of transition in between. In such contexts, art operates within spaces of performance and individual art objects are imbued with multiple meanings. We will investigate the historical nature of different art traditions in these cultures and evaluate specific art forms like painting, sculpture, mural painting, textiles and decorative arts, body adornment, masquerade performances, royal/leadership arts, and sacred, secular and vernacular architecture.

GE: AREA F, WORLD CULTURES
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION

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6G     Survey: History of Photography     TBA

A critical survey of nineteenth and twentieth century photography as an art form.

GE: AREA F, WRITING
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION

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6H   Survey: Arts of the Ancient Americas     Boswell

Visual Culture or "Art," that is to say architecture, sculpture and mural painting as well as textiles, metallurgy and ceramics, played a central and powerful role within the Precolumbian civilizations that produced them. Visual messages were encoded in the ways cities were built, stone and wood were carved, and leaders had themselves ornamented and buried. Using interdisciplinary methods, our goal will be to reconstruct (to the degree that is possible), the meaning and function of the visual arts in multiple, interlocking economic, political and sacred spheres. As an introduction to the ancient Americas, this course will focus on seven major cultures in Mesoamerica (Olmec, Teotihuacan, Maya, Aztec) and Andean South America (Chavín, Moche, and Inka).

GE: AREA F, WORLD CULTURES, WRITING
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION

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6J   Survey: Contemporary Architecture     White

Global survey of architectural production in the twenty-first century. Emphasis on form and technology, as well as economic, sociopolitical context. Explores built form at a variety of scales (buildings, cities, virtual spaces) as well as the concept of a "contemporary."

GE: AREA F
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION

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100   Methods for the History of Art and Architecture     Badamo

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen; designed for majors.

Introduces History of Art & Architecture majors to the methods and skills of research and scholarship in the field.

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103D    Introduction to Classical Archaeology     Moser

Prerequisite: upper-division standing

Introduces students to the field of Classical Archaeology through case studies drawn from all over the ancient world, with an emphasis on the Mediterranean. Explores both the practical methods of archaeology as well as the artifacts that are found and how they are preserved, displayed, and who owns them.

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105O   The Global Middle Ages: Visual and Cultural Encounters in the Medieval Mediterranean     Badamo

Prerequisite: upper-division standing.

Focusing on the Mediterranean, this course considers visual manifestations of exchange. Its goal is to examine the complexity of religious, political, and visual interactions in the Middle Ages, a period that brought together diverse religious communities, generating both social frictions and new cultural forms. Students will study the dynamic interplay among Christian, Jewish, and Islamic visual cultures as they developed and coalesced through commerce, gift exchange, the reinterpretation of pre-existing forms, and the reuse of objects and spaces.

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107A   Painting in the 15th-Century Netherlands     Meadow

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

Netherlandish painting from c. 1400 - c. 1500 examined in its social, religious,and cultural contexts. Van Eyck, Rogier, Bouts, and Memling, among others.

GE: AREA F

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107C   Renaissance Kunst- and Wunderkammern: The First Museums     Meadow

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

In the sixteenth century, wealthy merchants and powerful princes in Europe began assembling vast collections that aspired to contain all possible knowledge of all possible things. From these remarkably diverse collections—called Kunst- and Wunderkammern (German), studioli (Italian), and curiosity cabinets (English)—arose our modern museums of art, science, history and technology, as well as modern research collections in universities. This course explores these fascinating collections, the purposes that they served and the circumstances in which they were created.

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109D   Art and the Formation of Social Subjects in the Early Modern Period     Lumbreras

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

An approach to the art of the Renaissance that focuses on the viewer's experience and the social and cultural conditions framing it.

GE: AREA F

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111C   Dutch Art in the Age of Vermeer. The Golden Age: 1648 - 1672     Adams

Prerequisite: one History of Art & Architecture course or equivalent. Not open to freshmen.

This class covers art produced during the second half of the seventeenth century in Holland. This was the period from the recognition of the Northern Netherlands as an independent nation in 1648 to the end of the so-called “Golden Age” with the invasion of the Lowlands by France in 1672. The era witnessed the flowering of a Protestant mercantile culture which rivaled the political and economic power of that of monarchs and aristocrats across Europe. These men and women supported such artists as Rembrandt van Rijn and Jan Vermeer as well as a host of lesser known masters who created images rooted everyday life. This course examines the cultural functions of this rich, apparently descriptive imagery as it helped to form the private identities and public ambitions of Europe's first middle-class capitalist society. We examine the aesthetics and content of this imagery through contemporary economic, historic, religious, and literary developments, and the emerging scientific revolution.

The emphasis in this class is upon the social and intellectual issues engaged by Dutch painting: how they participated in the struggle between the values of a new middle-class and capitalist culture in conflict with an older way of life. At the same time, it examines the varieties of art historical methods employed by contemporary scholars, as well as those of the past, to understand these images. The goal of the course is to give students a solid grounding in knowledge about seventeenth century Dutch art and culture, with a focus upon critical analysis of images as well as the structure of arguments that have been made about them. These skills are intended to be ones that you may be able to apply both in other courses, as well as information you encounter and arguments you construct in your daily life.

GE: AREA F

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134K   Chinese Calligraphy: History and Aesthetics     Sturman
     [cross-listed with CHIN 134K]

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen. Students need to have been introduced to the Chinese writing system, whether through heritage or language instruction (Chinese or Japanese).

Examines the different scripts in historical context, surveys significant movements and artists, and considers the ideas, theories and aesthetic principles that have enriched the art of writing to elite status in China.

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136K   Modern Architecture in Early Twentieth-Century Europe     Welter

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.
Recommended Preparation: ARTHI 5A and/or ARTHI 6F.

History of modern architecture in Europe in the early twentieth century. Focuses on movements (for example, Art Nouveau, Futurism, Expressionism, Bauhaus, De Stijl, and Constructivism) and on individual architects (for example, Le Corbusier, Gropius, Mies van der Rohe.)

GE: AREA F, EUROPEAN TRADITIONS

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137GA   Architecture and Theory in Germany and Austria (1770-1870)     Wittman

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.
May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 12 units provided letter designations are different.

Special topics in architecture.

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141G   The Architecture of Museums and Galleries from c. 1800 to the Present     Welter

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

Discusses the history of museums and galleries as distinct modern building types by analyzing their architectural developments from approximately 1800 to the present. Beside architectural design issues (sequence of galleries, display of exhibits, lighting, visitor routes, etc.), the course analyzes museums as sites of memory, their intersections with the modern city, and their roles in cultural and societal debates. Geographically, the course focuses on both the museum’s origin in Europe and its contemporary universal presence.

GE: AREA F, EUROPEAN TRADITIONS, WRITING

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142D   Gardens, Land, and Landscape in the West: Renaissance to 1900     Wittman

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

Changing nature of garden and landscape design from the Renaissance to NYC's Central Park, studied as a function of the changing functions and status of land during the long passage from feudalism to industrial capitalism.

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163   Digital Visual Studies     TBA
     [cross-listed with C LIT 163 and GER 163]

Prerequisite: upper-division standing

In the past ten years, the scope of the digital humanities has broadened to include the visual world: "distant reading" became "distant viewing". This visual turn has not only facilitated the digital transformation of traditional disciplines like art history but has also introduced a new set of media-technological questions into the digital humanities discourse: questions concerning the nature of digital images, and the modalities of machine seeing. This course serves as an introduction to the emerging discipline of "digital visual studies" that investigates these questions. Participants will acquire skills in the analysis and critique of digital visual culture and learn to use contemporary digital tools to explore the visual world.

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186G   Seminar in Seventeenth Century Northern European Art     Adams

Prerequisite: upper-division standing.
May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 8 units with different topic. Open only to History of Art & Architecture majors during Pass 1.

Advanced studies in seventeenth century Northern European visual culture. Topics will vary. This course requires weekly readings and discussion, and the writing of a research seminar paper.

GE: WRITING

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187W   Coming Home: The House Museum as Cultural Encounter     White

Prerequisite: upper-division standing; designed for majors.
Open only to History of Art & Architecture majors during Pass 1.

This seminar studies the political and cultural history of the house museum in the United States, from its antebellum beginnings in the nineteenth century to the present. Explores a variety of issues related to the house museum, including curatorial and design choices, visitor experiences, and the House Museum Movement.

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187Z   Museum Studies Seminar     TBA

Prerequisite: upper-division standing; History of Art & Architecture majors only.
Open only to History of Art & Architecture majors during Pass 1. May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 12 units.

Examines a range of historical, theoretical, and practical issues with which the field of Museum Studies is engaged. Topics and format will vary.

GE: WRITING

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252B   Topics in Roman Architecture and Urbanism     Moser

Prerequisite: graduate standing or senior art history majors with consent of instructor.

Special research in Roman and late antique architecture.

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275E   Topics in Topics in Islamic Art     Khoury

Prerequisite: graduate standing.

Special topics in Islamic art and/or architecture. Topics will vary.

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297   Getty Graduate Consortium Seminar     F     1000-500   The Getty Research Institute
     Topic: The Fragment
     Consortium Scholar: Jenni Sorkin

Prerequisite: graduate standing; by application only (deadline: TBA).

Special graduate seminar offered at the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles, involving faculty and graduate students from the five graduate programs in Art History or Visual Studies located in southern California. For more information about the theme, visit the Getty Scholars Program site.

F   1000-500   The Getty Research Institute
     Orientation: TBA
     Seminars: TBA

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