2018-2019 Courses - Winter

Undergraduate

1   Introduction to Art - Paul
6B   Art Survey II: Renaissance - Baroque - Meadow
6DS   Survey: History of Art in China - Sturman
6F   Survey: Architecture and Planning - Wittman
6J   Survey: Contemporary Architecture - White

109B   Italian Renaissance Art: 1500 - 1600 - Travers
121D   African American Art and the African Legacy - Ogbechie
127A   African Art I - Ogbechie
132J    Modern Art of the Arab World - Khoury
134G   Japanese Painting - Wattles   [cross-listed with JAPAN 134G]
134J   Understanding Manga - Wattles   [cross-listed with JAPAN 134J]
134K   Chinese Calligraphy - Sturman   [cross-listed with CHIN 134K]
136I   The City in History - Chattopadhyay
136M   Revival Styles in Southern Californian Architecture - Welter
136W   Introduction to 2D/3D Visualizations in Architecture - White   [cross-listed with ART 106W]
142E   Architecture, Planning, and Culture in Eighteenth-Century Paris - Wittman
143E   Adaptive Reuse and Art - Baciu
144A   The Avantgarde in Russia - Spieker   [cross-listed with SLAV 144A]
148C    Art in California - Sorkin
186E   Seminar in Fifteenth and Sixteenth Century Northern European Art - Faust   [CANCELLED]
186SV/267   Seminar in Modern Architecture - Welter
187Z   Museum Studies Seminar: Going Global in America - Travers

Graduate

260D   Topics in European Art of the Twentieth Century - Monahan
263   Topics in Contemporary Art: Outsider/Outlier/Vernacular/Folk: Otherness in Art History - Sorkin
267/186SV   Topics in Modern Architecture - Welter
296A   Reading Critical Theory and the Visual Arts: Art, Activism, and Autonomy in Times of Crisis - Spieker
297   Getty Graduate Consortium: Monumentality


1   Introduction to Art     MW   1100-1215   TD-WEST 1701     Paul

This course is intended for students who have not taken classes in the History of Art and Architecture, and may or may not do so again. It is designed to develop basic visual skills and introduce students to the wide range of issues, works, and themes with which the History of Art and Architecture is engaged, varying from year to year. NOTE: Not open to History of Art & Architecture majors.

GE: AREA F
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION
     HONORS SECTION:  R   100-150   ARTS 2622

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6B   Art Survey II: Renaissance - Baroque     TR   200-315   IV THEATER 1     Meadow

A survey of Renaissance and Baroque art in northern and southern Europe.

GE: AREA E, AREA F, EUROPEAN TRADITIONS, WRITING
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION
     HONORS SECTION:   W   100-150   ARTS 1332

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6DS   Survey: History of Art in China     MW   200-315   HSSB 1174     Sturman

The History of Art in China is a survey course that introduces the major traditions and monuments of Chinese art from Neolithic times to the modern (20th-21st centuries). The course generally follows a chronological trajectory but with a thematic matrix. The first part of the course, from Neolithic to Han (ca. 5000 BC - AD 220) concerns the formation of culture and civilization and covers early pottery and bronze traditions as well as the beginnings of pictorial art. Objects and pictures are placed into their historical, philosophical, and social contexts. The second part of the course focuses on the importation and development of Buddhist art, from ca. AD 200 - 1000. The third part of the course interweaves the painting, calligraphy, and ceramic traditions of imperial China, from the Song dynasty to the near contemporary. Garden design and imperial architecture are also introduced. One of the aspects of the course that will be emphasized is regional diversity and intercultural encounters (India and Central Asia in particular). The title, History of Art in China, as opposed to something like The Arts of China, is intended to convey awareness of the fact art is a conceptual and subjective term and that objects have histories that extend beyond national borders.

GE: AREA F, WORLD CULTURES, WRITING
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION

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6F   Survey: Architecture and Planning     TR   1230-145   HSSB 1174     Wittman

This course offers a wide-ranging introduction to architecture and urban design from the earliest human constructions to the middle of the 20th century. The focus is decidedly global in the first half of the course, and more European in the second half. Students will encounter a variety of buildings and cities, but also different ways of understanding and studying them. Student writing assignments will involve the analysis of local architecture and town planning.

GE: AREA F, WRITING
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION

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6J   Survey: Contemporary Architecture     TR   500-615   HSSB 1174     White

Global survey of architectural production in the twenty-first century. Emphasis on form and technology, as well as economic, sociopolitical context. Explores built form at a variety of scales (buildings, cities, virtual spaces) as well as the concept of a "contemporary."

GE: AREA F
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION

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109B   Italian Renaissance Art: 1500 - 1600     TR   200-315   ARTS 1341     Travers

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

Developments in painting and sculpture with attention to issues of technique, iconography, patronage, workshop culture, and theory.

GE: AREA F

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121D   African American Art and the African Legacy     TR   1230-145   ARTS 1341     Ogbechie

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

This course examines the intersection of art, race, and identity in African-American arts and visual culture. It investigates the impact of an African legacy on African American identity, the role of race in the constitution of art narratives, the politics of representation in art, the constitution of social and cultural space, and notions of Diaspora identities in African-American art. It also analyzes key artists and discusses issues of gender and social class. Genres to be covered include Painting, Sculpture, Folk art, Film, Photography, Installation art, and Performance.

GE: AREA F, ETHNICITY

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127A   African Art I     TR   800-915   ARTS 1341     Ogbechie

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

This course provides an introduction to African art through analysis of African cultures and symbol systems. It evaluates African art in relation to the history and diversity of the continent and also in relation to perceptions and representations of Africa from antiquity to the contemporary era. Types of arts discussed include painting, sculpture, textiles and body adornment, ceramics, performance, and contemporary African art.

GE: AREA F, WORLD CULTURES

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132J   Modern Art of the Arab World     TR   1100-1215   ARTS 1341     Khoury

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

Explores modern and contemporary art, artists and art movements of the Arab world from nineteenth century to the present.

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134G   Japanese Painting     MW   930-1045   ARTS 1341     Wattles
     [cross-listed with JAPAN 134G]

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen. Open only to History of Art & Architecture majors during Pass 1.

The changing and entwined traditions of Japanese painting: those rooted in native concepts and practices and those derived from the Asian continent or Euro-America.

GE: AREA F, WORLD CULTURES

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134J   Understanding Manga     MW   1230-145   ARTS 1341     Wattles
     [cross-listed with JAPAN 134J]

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen. Open only to History of Art & Architecture majors during Pass 1.

This class will do close readings of manga (cartoons/comics/graphic novels by Japanese), considering examples from the 19th century to the present. We will analyze the visual design, narrative progression, and the word and image relationship. Historically, we will think about the shifting definition of manga through time and consider how politics, changing media, and globalization played a role in determining the form. Student discussion, presentations, and a paper required.

Previous knowledge of manga is welcomed (or more broadly Japan and Japanese).

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134K   Chinese Calligraphy     MW   1100-1215   ARTS 1332     Sturman
     [cross-listed with CHIN 134K]

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen. Students need to have been introduced to the Chinese writing system, whether through heritage or language instruction (Chinese or Japanese).

Examines the different scripts in historical context, surveys significant movements and artists, and considers the ideas, theories and aesthetic principles that have enriched the art of writing to elite status in China.

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136I   The City in History     TR   930-1045   ARTS 1341     Chattopadhyay

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

An historical introduction to the ideas and forms of cities with emphasis on modern urbanism. Examination of social theory to understand the role of industrial capitalism and colonialism in shaping the culture of modern cities, the relationship between the city and the country, the phenomena of class, race and ethnic separation.

GE: AREA E, AREA F

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136M   Revival Styles in Southern Californian Architecture     MW   200-315   ARTS 1332     Welter

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.
For Winter 2019, enrollment by department invitation only during Pass 1; remaining seats offered during Pass 2. Qualifies for Letters & Science Honors credit.

Californian architecture is characterized by a large variety of revival styles which reference ways of building from other geographic locations, time periods, and people.

What motivates the eclectic, mixed appearance of much of Californian architecture? Geographical or climatic conditions? Political powers (Spanish, Mexican, American) that have governed modern California? Do revival styles follow immigrants into California? Do they express the identity of the designer, the builder, or the occupier and user of a building?

The course examines the history of revival styles in especially Southern Californian architecture from approximately the eighteenth century to the mid-twentieth century. Historic and contemporary theories of what drives the choice of architectural styles will be introduced.

GE: AREA F

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136W   Introduction to 2D/3D Visualizations in Architecture     MW   800-1050   TD-WEST 1530     White
     [cross-listed with ART 106W]

Prerequisite: upper-division standing.
Open only to History of Art & Architecture majors and minors during Pass 1.

Develops skills in reading, interpreting, and visualizing 3D objects and spaces by offering excercises in sketching, perspective, orthographic projections, isometric drawings, ad manual rendering practices. Relevant for thse interested in history of architecture, sculpture, and such spatial practices as installations and public art.

GE: AREA F

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142E     Architecture, Planning, and Culture in Eighteenth-Century Paris     TR   330-445   ARTS 1341     Wittman

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

Paris (and Versailles) from the Sun King to the Revolution, rococo, neoclassicism, origins of urbanism; extensive use of primary texts in translation to study architectural debates in the press and their connection to contemporary political battles.

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143E     Adaptive Reuse and Art     F   900-1150   ARTS 1332     Baciu

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.
For Winter 2019, enrollment by department invitation only during Pass 1; remaining seats offered during Pass 2. Qualifies for Letters & Science Honors credit.

Most public places, buildings, galleries, and museums are transformed to varying degrees over the course of their history. This lecture explores how contemporary architects and artists rethought and repurposed historic structures.

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144A   The Avantgarde in Russia     T   500-750   ARTS 1341     Spieker
     [cross-listed with SLAV 144A]

Prerequisite: upper-division standing.
Same course as SLAV 130A. Not open for credit to students who have completed SLAV 144A or Russian 144A.

The Russian avantgarde in its European context. The avantgarde and the revolution of 1917. Analysis of key figures and movements within the Russian avantgarde. Taught in English.

GE: AREA F

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148C    Art in California     MW   1100-1215   ARTS 1341     Sorkin

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

As a state, California is the site of tremendous diversity in the visual arts but has consistently suffered from stereotypes that framed it as a regional backwater far from New York and Europe. This lecture-based course addresses the character and role of the post-war art and its developments in and beyond the cities of Los Angeles and San Francisco. Movements studied include Mexican Muralism, the rise of modern photography, Asian American culture, assemblage and sculpture, the Black Arts movement, feminism, as well as pioneering developments in installation, video and performance art.

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186E   Seminar in Fifteenth and Sixteenth Century Northern European Art     Faust

   [CANCELLED]

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186SV/267   Seminar in Architecture and Environment     M   900-1150   ARTS 2622     Welter

Prerequisite: upper-division standing.
May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 8 units. Open only to History of Art & Architecture majors during Pass 1.

Advanced studies in architecture and environment. Topics vary including active archival research. The course requires weekly readings and discussions, and the writing of a research seminar paper.

GE: WRITING

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187Z   Museum Studies Seminar     R   1000-1250   ARTS 2622     Travers
     Topic: Going Global in America

Prerequisite: upper-division standing; enrollment by instructor approval only.
May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 12 units. Open only to History of Art & Architecture majors during Pass 1.

Art history is in the midst of a turn towards the “Global.” In the case of early modern European art, this approach has been critiqued as reinforcing traditional canonical hierarchies within the discipline, rather than challenging them. How do/can art historians and curators construct balanced presentations of “Global” narratives? Using examples of exhibitions hosted by American museums, this seminar will analyze approaches taken to this theme over the last ten years. In the course of the term, we will examine the organization and display of images and objects from a range of cultures and geographic regions to investigate the meaning of the “Global” in relation to Western art and the early modern period.

GE: WRITING

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260D   Topics in European Art of the Twentieth Century     W   1200-250   ARTS 2622     Monahan

Prerequisite: graduate standing.

Special research in modern art.

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263   Topics in Contemporary Art     M   200-450   ARTS 2622     Sorkin
     Topic: Outsider/Outlier/Vernacular/Folk: Otherness in Art History

Prerequisite: graduate standing.

This seminar will explore the hierarchies and histories that exist between trained artists and outlier artists—artists that have been variously label “outsiders” for a variety of reasons, such as being self-taught, mentally ill, non-white/rural/poor, and otherwise marginalized—in their assessment, visibility, and circulation. We take, as our starting point, Lynne Cooke’s exhibition Outliers and American Vanguard Art, on view at LACMA from November 18, 2018 to March 18, 2019, which we will visit as a class, and which is the subject of a symposium I am co-organizing for the museum on Friday, March 1, 2018, which students will be required to attend in lieu of class that week.

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267/186SV   Topics in Modern Architecture     M   900-1150   ARTS 2622     Welter

Prerequisite: graduate standing.

Special research in modern architecture.

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296A   Reading Critical Theory and the Visual Arts    R   500-750   ARTS 2622    Spieker
     Topic: Art, Activism, and Autonomy in Times of Crisis

Prerequisite: graduate standing.
Same course as GER 270; cross-listed with C LIT 200 & ART 245

One of the most powerful contestations of the autonomy of art—the idea that art and literature are separate by nature from everyday life—was issued by the philosopher T. W. Adorno when he questioned whether “after Auschwitz” poetry could still be written. In recent years, there has been renewed interest in the problem of art's autonomy, especially on the part of Marxist critics who critique the pervasive commodification and co-optation of art and argue for the need to reinstate its independence in some form. Yet, how can autonomous art provide much-needed resistance to the pervasive oppression and discrimination we are witnessing all around us? The seminar will seek to provide both a historical reconstruction of artistic autonomy (Schiller, Kant) and read the work of contemporary philosophers and historians who have considered the issue (Boris Arvatov; Vladimir Nabokov; T. W. Adorno; Peter Bürger; John Roberts; Alain Badiou; Jacques Rancière; Peter Osborne; Jürgen Habermas). Discussions are supplemented by the consideration of the work of contemporary artists and writers in whose practice the problem of autonomy and its practicality comes to the fore.

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297   Getty Graduate Consortium Seminar     F     1000-500   The Getty Research Institute
     Topic: Monumentality and Its Discontents
     Consortium Scholar: Edward Dimendberg, Getty Scholar and Professor of Humanities and European Languages and Studies, University of California, Irvine

Prerequisite: graduate standing; by application only (deadline: October 26, 2018).

Special graduate seminar offered at the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles, involving faculty and graduate students from the five graduate programs in Art History or Visual Studies located in southern California. For more information about the theme and application process, visit the Getty Scholars Program site and view the Consortium Seminar flyer.

F   1000-500   The Getty Research Institute
     Orientation: November 30, 2018
     Seminars: January 11, 18, 25; February 1, 8, 22; March 1, 8, 2019

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