2021-2022 Courses - Summer

NOTE: All History of Art & Architecture courses use the prefix ARTHI


(updated 6/14/2022)

Crashing a History of Art & Architecture Course

The Department of History of Art & Architecture recognizes the difficulties that students face in adding courses and recommends the following when trying to add a closed or full course:

  1. Please do NOT email the instructor to see if there is a waiting list. Instead, sign up on the waiting list on GOLD
    • Make sure to fill out your name, major/minor, and class year (e.g., third year, fourth year)
    • Please note that the enrollment availability listed on GOLD might not accurately reflect the latest enrollment for the course
    • Reminder: students cannot add themselves to a waitlist unless one of the following occurs: the student has enrolled in 12 units, or all lectures and sections of the course are full or closed
  2. Attend and participate in all lecture and section (if applicable) meetings and assignments for the first week, both synchronous and asynchronous
    • If you are unable to attend a class and/or section meeting due to religious observance, illness, or other unavoidable conflict, do contact the instructor via email
  3. If you haven't been admitted to the course prior to the first class, also try joining the GauchoSpace course site, if a page exists, as another way to follow the first week of class
    • NOTE: Even if you are able to join the GauchoSpace site, this does not mean you are officially enrolled in the course. You must be registered on GOLD to receive credit for the course
  4. Continue attending lectures and discussion sections until you receive admission
    • Priority of enrollment and distribution of add codes are at the discretion of the instructor. Generally speaking, priority is given to those who participate in lectures and discussion sections - please note crashing protocol may vary by instructor

Add codes will not be distributed prior to completing this procedure.


Undergraduate

5A   Introduction to Architecture & Environment (Session B) - Jameson-Ellsmore
6C   Art Survey III: Modern - Contemporary (Session A) - Mirzaei
6E   Survey: Arts of Africa, Oceania, and Native North America (Session A) - Ogbechie
6F   Survey: Architecture and Planning (Session A) - Sheard
6J   Survey: Contemporary Architecture (Session B) - White
6L   Playful Spaces: A Cultural History of Games (Session A) - White

117F   Impressionism and Post-Impressionism (Session B) - Garfinkle
121E   Three-Dimensional Arts of the United States: Meaning, Context, Reception (Session A) - Garfinkle
136I   The City in History (Session A) - Chattopadhyay


5A   Introduction to Architecture & Environment (Session B)     MTWR   1230-150   BUCHANAN 1930     Jameson-Ellsmore

Architecture is an act of place-making through which humans have constructed their relation with nature. Introduces the history of these strategies of place-making, interpretative concepts, and discipline-specific terminology in order to develop a critical understanding of the relationship between nature and built form.

GE: AREA F, WRITING
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION

Course Website

top


6C   Art Survey III: Modern - Contemporary (Session A)     MTWR   200-320   ONLINE: ASYNCHRONOUS; ONE WEEKLY SYNCHRONOUS MEETING (R 200-320)     Mirzaei

History of Western art from the eighteenth century to the present.

GE: AREA E, AREA F, EUROPEAN TRADITIONS, WRITING
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION - NOTE: SECTIONS TAUGHT SYNCHRONOUSLY

Course Website (via GauchoSpace Link opens in a new window)

top


6E   Survey: Arts of Africa, Oceania, and Native North America (Session A)     MTWR   1100-1220   ONLINE: SYNCHRONOUS     Ogbechie

This course provides a general introduction to the indigenous and contemporary arts of Africa, Oceania, and Native North America. In these vast locales of human culture, we will study how art provides concrete conceptual and visual structures around which social, political, cultural aesthetic and ritual institutions are constructed. The art object, imbued with several meanings, is essential to the human lifecycle, charged with political, economic and spiritual connotations and instrumental to rituals of birth, death and all the stages of transition in between. In such contexts, art operates within spaces of performance and individual art objects are imbued with multiple meanings. We will investigate the historical nature of different art traditions in these cultures and evaluate specific art forms like painting, sculpture, mural painting, textiles and decorative arts, body adornment, masquerade performances, royal/leadership arts, and sacred, secular and vernacular architecture.

GE: AREA F, WORLD CULTURES
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION - NOTE: SECTIONS TAUGHT SYNCHRONOUSLY

Course Website (via GauchoSpace Link opens in a new window)

top


6F   Survey: Architecture and Planning (Session A)     MTWR   1230-150   ARTS 1341     Sheard

This course offers a wide-ranging introduction to architecture and urban design from the earliest human constructions to the middle of the 20th century. The focus is decidedly global in the first half of the course, and more European in the second half. Students will encounter a variety of buildings and cities, but also different ways of understanding and studying them. Student writing assignments will involve the analysis of local architecture and town planning.

GE: AREA F, WRITING
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION

Course Website (via GauchoSpace Link opens in a new window)

top


6J   Survey: Contemporary Architecture (Session B)     MTWR   1100-1220   BUCHANAN 1940     White

Global survey of architectural production in the twenty-first century. Emphasis on form and technology, as well as economic, sociopolitical context. Explores built form at a variety of scales (buildings, cities, virtual spaces) as well as the concept of a "contemporary."

GE: AREA F
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION

Course Website

top


6L   Playful Spaces: A Cultural History of Games (Session A)     MTWR   1100-1220   LSB 1001     White

This course introduces students to the history of games. It is organized chronologically as a global survey. We study games and the social, political,and economic conditions that support them, as well as the interface between the human player and the imagined world of the game. Taking as its premise that games are artifacts of culture, this course focuses on the visual and spatial practice of games in social context.

GE: AREA E, AREA F, WRITING
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION

Course Website (via GauchoSpace Link opens in a new window)

top


117F   Impressionism and Post-Impressionism (Session B)     MTWR   1100-1220   ARTS 1341     Garfinkle

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

Impressionist and Post-Impressionist movement in France from 1863 through the first decade of the twentieth century and the advent of Cubism. Includes the work of Monet, Manet, Degas, Renoir, Pissarro, Van Gogh, Cezanne, Gauguin, and Seurat.

GE: AREA F

Course Website

top


121E   Three-Dimensional Arts of the United States: Meaning, Context, Reception (Session A)     MTWR   200-320   ARTS 1341     Garfinkle

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

From Puritan gravestones to park fountains to war memorials, American sculpture has been a barometer of the political, cultural, religious and artistic trends of our society. This course covers the carvings of the first settlements, figural sculpture of colonial America, various art movements and sculptural forms from the nineteenth to twenty-first centuries as well as the current controversies surrounding public art.

GE: AREA F, AMERICAN HISTORY AND INSTITUTIONS, WRITING

Course Website (via GauchoSpace Link opens in a new window)

top


136I   The City in History (Session A)     MTWR   930-1050   ARTS 1341     Chattopadhyay

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

An historical introduction to the ideas and forms of cities with emphasis on modern urbanism. Examination of social theory to understand the role of industrial capitalism and colonialism in shaping the culture of modern cities, the relationship between the city and the country, the phenomena of class, race and ethnic separation.

GE: AREA E, AREA F

Course Website (via GauchoSpace Link opens in a new window)

top