2022-2023 Courses - Spring

(tentative; updated 5/24/2022)

Undergraduate

5A   Introduction to Architecture & Environment - Chattopadhyay
6G   Survey: History of Photography - TBA
W 6R   Rome: The Game - Moser/Thomas   [cross-listed with WRIT W 6R]

105O   The Global Middle Ages: Visual and Cultural Encounters in the Medieval Mediterranean - Badamo
109C   Art, Science, and Technology in the Renaissance - Lumbreras
111B   Dutch Art in the Age of Rembrandt and Frans Hals. The Birth of a Nation: 1579 - 1648 - Adams
119B   Contemporary Art ‐ Sorkin
120CV   Coloring Vision: The Meanings and Markings of Color in Modern Culture – Monahan
130D   Art and Archaeology of the Ancient Andes - Boswell
130F   Art and Archaeology of Mesoamerica - Boswell
136C   Architecture of the United States - White
141A   Museum Practices and Techniques - Ritter
141D   Birth of the Modern Museum - Paul
186C   Seminar in Medieval Art - Badamo
186K   Seminar in Twentieth Century Modern Art & Visual Culture - Monahan
187Z   Museum Studies Seminar - TBA

Graduate

257A   Topics in Seventeenth-Century European Art - Adams
282A   Topics on East Asian Art - Sturman


5A   Introduction to Architecture & Environment     Chattopadhyay

Architecture is an act of place-making through which humans have constructed their relation with nature. This course Introduces the history of these strategies of place-making, interpretative concepts, and discipline-specific terminology in order to develop a critical understanding of the relationship between nature and built form.

GE: AREA F, WRITING
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION

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6G     Survey: History of Photography     McLemore

A critical survey of nineteenth and twentieth century photography as an art form.

GE: AREA F, WRITING
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION

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W 6R   Rome: The Game     Moser/Thomas
     [cross-listed with WRIT W 6R]

Open to non-majors.

This online course - presented as an adventure game - introduces students to the art and archaeology of Rome, with assignments that focus on writing and the research process. The course asks students to determine whether or not a collection of ancient objects from an American museum should remain in the US or be sent back to Italy. Throughout the course, students excavate artifacts at a digital dig site, visit museums, explore Roman monuments, and navigate the shadowy world of the tombaroli (tomb robbers) and mafia-run black market for antiquities.

GE: AREA E, AREA F, EUROPEAN TRADITIONS, WRITING
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION

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105O   The Global Middle Ages: Visual and Cultural Encounters in the Medieval Mediterranean     Badamo

Prerequisite: upper-division standing.

Focusing on the Mediterranean, this course considers visual manifestations of exchange. Its goal is to examine the complexity of religious, political, and visual interactions in the Middle Ages, a period that brought together diverse religious communities, generating both social frictions and new cultural forms. Students will study the dynamic interplay among Christian, Jewish, and Islamic visual cultures as they developed and coalesced through commerce, gift exchange, the reinterpretation of pre-existing forms, and the reuse of objects and spaces.

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109C   Art, Science, and Technology in the Renaissance     Lumbreras

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

An approach to the art of the Renaissance that focuses on intersections with scientific and technological practices that conditioned its historical development.

GE: AREA F

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111B   Dutch Art in the Age of Rembrandt and Frans Hals. The Birth of a Nation: 1579 - 1648     Adams

Prerequisite: one History of Art & Architecture course or equivalent. Not open to freshmen.

The first half of the seventeenth century in Holland, the period from the Union of Utrecht of 1579 and its declaration of independence from Spain, to the recognition of the Northern Netherlands as an independent nation in 1648, was the first part of a century that has come to be known as the Dutch "Golden Age" of Dutch art. This era witnessed the emergence of a Protestant mercantile culture in which the Catholic Church and the hereditary nobility were supplanted by democratic institutions and middle-class merchants as major patrons of the arts. These men and women supported such artists as Rembrandt van Rijn and Frans Hals as well as a host of lesser known masters who created images rooted in everyday life rather than the imaginary religious, historical, and mythological imagery of previous centuries. This course examines the cultural functions of this rich, apparently descriptive imagery as it helped to form the private identities and public ambitions of Europe's first middle-class capitalist society. We examine the aesthetics and content of this imagery through contemporary economic, historic, religious, and literary developments, and the emerging scientific revolution.

The emphasis in this class is upon the social and intellectual issues engaged by Dutch painting: how they participated in the struggle between the values of a new middle-class and capitalist culture in conflict with an older way of life. At the same time, it examines the varieties of art historical methods employed by contemporary scholars, as well as those of the past, to understand these images. The goal of the course is to give students a solid grounding in knowledge about seventeenth century Dutch art and culture, with a focus upon critical analysis of images as well as the structure of arguments that have been made about them. These skills are intended to be ones that you may be able to apply both in other courses, as well as information you encounter and arguments you construct in your daily life.

GE: AREA F

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119B   Contemporary Art     Sorkin

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

Study of recent artistic developments, from pop to contemporary movements in painting, sculpture, and photography. Movements studied include minimal art, post‐minimalism, process art, conceptual art, earthworks, pluralism, neoexpressionism, and issues of postmodern art and criticism.

GE: AREA F

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 120CV   Coloring Vision: The Meanings and Markings of Color in Modern Culture     Monahan

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.
May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 12 units provided letter designations are different.

How do we understand the color red, or green, or blue, or yellow? We might argue that red is red, a constant. But how does red – or any color – change across time? When is red understood as anger while elsewhere it is seen as warmth? Consider that white is often associated with purity, yet it can also signify mourning and death. How do these meanings develop? What are the circumstances that create such shifts?

This course will look at the meanings of color as it appears in everything from marketing strategies to artistic expression, and how these meanings shift across time. We will investigate why cars and refrigerators were suddenly produced in colors. How does society perceive color, such that our understanding of a person can change depending on the color of his hair or her skin? Or a wall painted blue changes the mood of a room that had previously been yellow? What are “happy colors”? How does a depressed person get characterized as “blue,” “see red”? We will look at the way color is woven into the cultural fabric of societies, and how our vision registers color in a myriad of ways, as for example in art, fashion, mood, photography, or advertising.

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130D   Art and Archaeology of the Ancient Andes     Boswell

Prerequisite: upper-division standing.

Introduces students to the field of Classical Archaeology through case studies drawn from all over the ancient world, with an emphasis on the Mediterranean. Explores both the practical methods of archaeology as well as the artifacts that are found and how they are preserved, displayed, and who owns them.

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130F   Art and Archaeology of Mesoamerica     Boswell

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

An introduction to the societies of Ancient Mesoamerica. The course examines sociopolitical, religious, and economic systems from the Olmec through Aztecs via the study of material culture - including art, architecture, and artifacts. Explores topics of identity, social status, and exchange.

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136C   Architecture of the United States     White

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

This course examines the history of architecture and urban planning in North America, focusing primarily on the geography of the United States. It is a study of architects and builders, patrons and occupants, as well as the historical forces and events that have transformed the landscape. Art, design, engineering, economics, and politics are the subjects of this course, with special emphasis on the way these interact to create an outlook or world view. This course is as much about culture as it is about the space of culture.

GE: AREA F

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141A   Museum Practices and Techniques     Ritter

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen; consent of instructor.
Not open for credit to students who have completed ARTHI 164C.

Discussion of various aspects of museum work: management principles, the cataloging and care of art objects, exhibitions and acquisitions, administrative procedures, museum architecture. Specialist lectures and visits of museums and their facilities.

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141D   Birth of the Modern Museum     Paul

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

Course examines the emergence and development of museums of art in eighteenth-century Europe, tracing their origins to the private collections from which they evolved and studying the practices, such as tourism, that stimulated their growth.

GE: AREA F

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186C   Seminar in Medieval Art     Badamo

Prerequisite: upper-division standing.
May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 8 units. Open only to History of Art & Architecture majors during Pass 1.

Advanced studies in Medieval art. Topics will vary. This course requires weekly readings and discussion, and the writing of a research seminar paper.

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186K   Seminar in Twentieth Century Modern Art & Visual Culture     Monahan

Prerequisite: upper-division standing.
May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 8 units. Open only to History of Art & Architecture majors during Pass 1.

Advanced studies in twentieth century modern art. Topics will vary. This course requires weekly readings and discussion, and the writing of a research seminar paper.

GE: WRITING

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187Z   Museum Studies Seminar     TBA

Prerequisite: upper-division standing; History of Art & Architecture majors only.
Open only to History of Art & Architecture majors during Pass 1. May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 12 units.

Examines a range of historical, theoretical, and practical issues with which the field of Museum Studies is engaged. Topics and format will vary.

GE: WRITING

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257A   Topics in Seventeenth-Century European Art     Adams

Prerequisite: graduate standing.

Special topics in seventeenth-century European Art.

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282A   Topics on East Asian Art     Sturman

Prerequisite: graduate standing.

Research on select problems on the arts of China, Japan, or Korea.

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