2021-2022 Courses - Spring

Undergraduate

5A   Introduction to Architecture & Environment - Chattopadhyay
6DL   Survey: Landscape in China - Sturman
W 6R   Rome: The Game - Moser/Thomas   [cross-listed with WRIT W 6R]

105P   Introduction to Medieval Art and Architecture - Badamo
109C   Art, Science, and Technology in the Renaissance - Lumbreras
113A   Seventeenth Century Art in Southern Europe - Paul
136C   Architecture of the United States - White
141A   Museum Practices and Techniques - McLemore
141MH   Museums and History - Ritter
186D   Seminar in Medieval Architecture & Sculpture - Badamo
186E/255D   Seminar in Fifteenth and Sixteenth Century Northern European Art: Museums and Cultural Politics - Meadow
186P   Seminar in Pre-Columbian/Colonial Art: The Art of the Empire - Caplan
186SR   Seminar in Architectural History: Persian Architecture Unglazed - Overton
186SS   Seminar in Architectural History & Urbanism - Chattopadhyay

Graduate

200A   Proseminar: Introduction to Art-Historical Methods - Ogbechie
255D/186E   Topics in 15th- & 16th-Century Art in Northern Europe: Museums and Cultural Politics - Meadow
260D   Topics in European Art of the Twentieth Century - Monahan
296A   Reading Critical Theory and the Visual Arts - Spieker   [cross-listed with C LIT 200 and GER 210]


5A   Introduction to Architecture & Environment     TR   200-315   IV THEATER 1     Chattopadhyay

Architecture is an act of place-making through which humans have constructed their relation with nature. This course Introduces the history of these strategies of place-making, interpretative concepts, and discipline-specific terminology in order to develop a critical understanding of the relationship between nature and built form.

GE: AREA F, WRITING
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION

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6DL   Survey: Landscape in China     MW   200-315   BUCHANAN 1940     Sturman

A chronological survey of the evolution of landscape as subject matter in Chinese art and culture, from its origins in concepts of empire and domain, to the absorption of religious and philosophical values, to its later expression in the early modern and modern periods. The course ends with consideration of landscape's fate in contemporary society.

GE: AREA E, AREA F, WORLD CULTURES, WRITING
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION

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W 6R   Rome: The Game     ONLINE: ASYNCHRONOUS      Moser/Thomas
     [cross-listed with WRIT W 6R]

Open to non-majors.

This online course - presented as an adventure game - introduces students to the art and archaeology of Rome, with assignments that focus on writing and the research process. The course asks students to determine whether or not a collection of ancient objects from an American museum should remain in the US or be sent back to Italy. Throughout the course, students excavate artifacts at a digital dig site, visit museums, explore Roman monuments, and navigate the shadowy world of the tombaroli (tomb robbers) and mafia-run black market for antiquities.

GE: AREA E, AREA F, EUROPEAN TRADITIONS, WRITING
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION - NOTE: SECTIONS TAUGHT SYNCHRONOUSLY

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105P   Introduction to Medieval Art and Architecture     MW   930-1045   ARTS 1341     Badamo

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

This course explores the soaring cathedrals, monstrous sculptures, and marvelous images that inspired The Lord of the Rings and Game of Thrones. Beginning with the fourth-century rise of Christian images and ending with the advent of print, it traces how images developed new roles - and reinvented old ones - over the course of the Middle Ages. Investigating architecture, sculpture, and manuscripts in their historical contexts, it asks why medieval objects look the way the do and how viewers saw them.

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109C   Art, Science, and Technology in the Renaissance     MW   1100-1215   ARTS 1341     Lumbreras

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

An approach to the art of the Renaissance that focuses on intersections with scientific and technological practices that conditioned its historical development.

GE: AREA F

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113A   Seventeenth Century Art in Southern Europe     MW   1230-145   ARTS 1341     Paul

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.
Not open to students who have completed ARTHI 113B.

Painting and sculpture from Italy and Spain as well as France and Flanders examined in its cultural, political, and religious contexts with particular attention to relationships between regional traditions and international trends. Artists studied include Caravaggio, Bernini, Velazquez, Poussin, and Rubens.

GE: AREA F

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136C   Architecture of the United States     TR   1000-1115   ARTS 1332     White

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

This course examines the history of architecture and urban planning in North America, focusing primarily on the geography of the United States. It is a study of architects and builders, patrons and occupants, as well as the historical forces and events that have transformed the landscape. Art, design, engineering, economics, and politics are the subjects of this course, with special emphasis on the way these interact to create an outlook or world view. This course is as much about culture as it is about the space of culture.

GE: AREA F

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141A   Museum Practices and Techniques     MW   330-445   ARTS 1341     McLemore

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen; consent of instructor.
Not open for credit to students who have completed ARTHI 164C.

Discussion of various aspects of museum work: management principles, the cataloging and care of art objects, exhibitions and acquisitions, administrative procedures, museum architecture. Specialist lectures and visits of museums and their facilities.

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141MH   Museums and History     TR   330-445   ARTS 1341     Ritter

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen; designed for majors.
Recommended Preparation: ARTHI 5B.

Examines the 20th century museum’s engagement with history. Explores curatorial strategies for telling stories about the past through historical objects, written narratives, photography, performance, architecture, and art.

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186D   Seminar in Medieval Architecture & Sculpture     W   1100-150   ARTS 2622     Badamo

Prerequisite: upper-division standing.
May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 8 units. Open only to History of Art & Architecture majors during Pass 1.

Advanced studies in Medieval architecture and sculpture. Topics will vary. This course requires weekly readings and discussion, and the writing of a research seminar paper.

GE: WRITING

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186E/255D   Seminar in Fifteenth and Sixteenth Century Northern European Art     F   100-350   ARTS 2622     Meadow
     Topic: Museums and Cultural Politics

Prerequisite: upper-division standing.
May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 8 units. Open only to History of Art & Architecture majors during Pass 1.

Why do we have special buildings dedicated to looking at objects? What are the principles that determine how different kinds of objects are displayed? What are our expectations about museums and what expectations do museums have about their visitors? Why are so many museums (whether of art, culture, history, science, religion, technology or otherwise) so politically and socially charged that seemingly unending controversies arise concerning sexuality, ethics, authenticity and ownership?

Through the lens of wide-ranging readings in museum theory, this seminar examines the museum as an institution and a set of cultural practices. We will think about the museum as a site of ritual and a cultural and political battleground. We will also ponder the pros and cons of the doubts that have been raised by critics about the ability, or suitability, of museums to speak to non-traditional audiences. Another of our themes will be the question of cultural patrimony and museums of ethnology and ethnic art in a post-colonial world. Finally, we will select a set of recent museum controversies and debate the merits of the exhibitions and the efficacy of the responses.

GE: WRITING

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186P   Seminar in Pre-Columbian/Colonial Art: The Art of the Empire     R   200-450   ARTS 2622     Caplan

Prerequisite: upper-division standing.
Open only to History of Art & Architecture majors during Pass 1.

Advanced studies in pre-Columbian/colonial art. Topics will vary. This course requires weekly readings and discussion, and the writing of a research seminar paper.

GE: WRITING

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186SR   Seminar in Architectural History      R   1100-150   ARTS 2622     Overton
     Topic: Persian Architecture Unglazed

Prerequisite: upper-division standing.
May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 8 units. Open only to History of Art & Architecture majors during Pass 1.

Advanced studies in architectural history. Topics will vary. This course requires weekly readings and discussion, and the writing of a research seminar paper.

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186SS   Seminar in Architectural History & Urbanism      W   900-1150   ARTS 1332     Chattopadhyay

Prerequisite: upper-division standing.
May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 8 units. Open only to History of Art & Architecture majors during Pass 1.

Advanced studies in architectural history and urbanism. Topics will vary. This course requires weekly readings and discussion, and the writing of a research seminar paper.

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200A   Proseminar: Introduction to Art-Historical Methods     T   1000-1250   ARTS 1245     Ogbechie

Prerequisite: graduate standing; History of Art & Architecture majors only.
Required of all first-year M.A./Ph.D. students.

Introduction to art-historical methods, with emphasis on the historical development of current practices, critical theory, debates within the field, and cross-disciplinary dialogues.

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255D/186E   Topics in 15th & 16th Century Art in Northern Europe     F   100-350   ARTS 2622     Meadow
     Topic: Museums and Cultural Politics

Prerequisite: graduate standing.

Why do we have special buildings dedicated to looking at objects? What are the principles that determine how different kinds of objects are displayed?  What are our expectations about museums and what expectations do museums have about their visitors? Why are so many museums (whether of art, culture, history, science, religion, technology or otherwise) so politically and socially charged that seemingly unending controversies arise concerning sexuality, ethics, authenticity and ownership?

Through the lens of wide-ranging readings in museum theory, this seminar examines the museum as an institution and a set of cultural practices. We will think about the museum as a site of ritual and a cultural and political battleground. We will also ponder the pros and cons of the doubts that have been raised by critics about the ability, or suitability, of museums to speak to non-traditional audiences. Another of our themes will be the question of cultural patrimony and museums of ethnology and ethnic art in a post-colonial world. Finally, we will select a set of recent museum controversies and debate the merits of the exhibitions and the efficacy of the responses.

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260D   Topics in European Art of the Twentieth Century     R   200-450   ARTS 1245     Monahan

Prerequisite: graduate standing.

Special research in twentieth-century art.

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296A   Reading Critical Theory and the Visual Arts     R   100-350   PHELPS 6206C     Spieker
     
[cross-listed with C LIT 200 and GER 210]

Prerequisite: graduate standing.

Analysis of theories and critiques of modernism and modernity from Benjaminto Adorno and Derrida, with special focus on the historical avantgarde. Specifics may vary.

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