2020-2021 Courses - Spring

Undergraduate

5A   Introduction to Architecture & Environment - Chattopadhyay
6C   Art Survey III: Modern - Contemporary - Sorkin
6DS   Survey: History of Art in China - Sturman
6L   Playful Spaces: A Cultural History of Games - White

105Q   Art and War - Badamo
107A   Painting in the 15th-Century Netherlands - Meadow
119F   Art of the Post-War Period, 1945 - 1968 - Monahan
121D   African American Art and the African Legacy - Ogbechie
132I   Art of Empire - Khoury
136C   Architecture of the United States - White
138B   Contemporary Photography - McLemore
138C   Social Documentary Photography - McLemore
141D   Birth of the Modern Museum - Paul
141MH   Museums and History: The Americas on Display - Pardo Gaviria
186A/293D   Seminar in Research Methods: Methods in Digital Art History - Gidding
186O   Seminar in Latin American Art: Art and Animate Matter: Visual Culture in the Classic Maya World - Clarke
186RS/282A   Seminar in Chinese Art: Trauma and Memory—Art after Dynastic Collapse - Sturman
186SS   Seminar in Architectural History & Urbanism: Building the Modern World - Chattopadhyay
187Z   Museum Studies Seminar: A History of Exhibitions in Latin America - Pardo Gaviria

Graduate

253D   Topics in Medieval Architecture & Sculpture: Living Monuments - Badamo
254   Topics in Pre-Columbian/Colonial Latin American Art: Mexican Manuscripts, Chicanx Codices - Caplan
282A/186RS   Topics on East Asian Art: Trauma and Memory—Art after Dynastic Collapse - Sturman
293D/186A   Research Methods: Methods in Digital Art History - Gidding


5A   Introduction to Architecture & Environment     TR   500-615   SYNCHRONOUS & ASYNCHRONOUS     Chattopadhyay

Architecture is an act of place-making through which humans have constructed their relation with nature. This course Introduces the history of these strategies of place-making, interpretative concepts, and discipline-specific terminology in order to develop a critical understanding of the relationship between nature and built form.

GE: AREA F, WRITING
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION

top


6C   Art Survey III: Modern - Contemporary     TR   930-1045   ASYNCHRONOUS     Sorkin

History of Western art from the eighteenth century to the present.

GE: AREA E, AREA F, EUROPEAN TRADITIONS, WRITING
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION - NOTE: SECTIONS TAUGHT SYNCHRONOUSLY
     HONORS SECTION:  W   100-150   SYNCHRONOUS

top


6DS   Survey: History of Art in China     MW   200-315   ASYNCHRONOUS     Sturman

The History of Art in China is a survey course that introduces the major traditions and monuments of Chinese art from Neolithic times to the modern (20th-21st centuries). The course generally follows a chronological trajectory but with a thematic matrix. The first part of the course, from Neolithic to Han (ca. 5000 BC - AD 220) concerns the formation of culture and civilization and covers early pottery and bronze traditions as well as the beginnings of pictorial art. Objects and pictures are placed into their historical, philosophical, and social contexts. The second part of the course focuses on the importation and development of Buddhist art, from ca. AD 200 - 1000. The third part of the course interweaves the painting, calligraphy, and ceramic traditions of imperial China, from the Song dynasty to the near contemporary. Garden design and imperial architecture are also introduced. One of the aspects of the course that will be emphasized is regional diversity and intercultural encounters (India and Central Asia in particular). The title, History of Art in China, as opposed to something like The Arts of China, is intended to convey awareness of the fact art is a conceptual and subjective term and that objects have histories that extend beyond national borders.

GE: AREA F, WORLD CULTURES, WRITING
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION - NOTE: SECTIONS TAUGHT SYNCHRONOUSLY

top


6L   Playful Spaces: A Cultural History of Games     TR   1230-145   ASYNCHRONOUS     White

This course introduces students to the history of games. It is organized chronologically as a global survey. We study games and the social, political,and economic conditions that support them, as well as the interface between the human player and the imagined world of the game. Taking as its premise that games are artifacts of culture, this course focuses on the visual and spatial practice of games in social context.

GE: AREA E, AREA F, WRITING
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION - NOTE: SECTIONS TAUGHT SYNCHRONOUSLY

top


105Q   Art and War     MW   1100-1215   ONLINE     Badamo

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

We often think about art as a bridge between cultures and look to masterpieces like the Sistine Chapel as the height of a nation's cultural achievements. But during times of war, art can become military targets and destroyed, or used to create enemies. Conversely, art has been employed to resist political establishments, critique violence, and provide therapy for veterans. Drawing examples from different time periods, this course investigates the myriad ways art has been used - and abused - during military conflict.

top


107A   Painting in the 15th-Century Netherlands     TR   1230-145   ONLINE     Meadow

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

Netherlandish painting from c. 1400 - c. 1500 examined in its social, religious,and cultural contexts. Van Eyck, Rogier, Bouts, and Memling, among others.

GE: AREA F

top


119F   Art of the Post-War Period, 1945 - 1968     TR   1100-1215   ONLINE     Monahan

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.
Recommended Preparation: ARTHI 119E

An examination of major artistic developments in Europe and the United States after the Second World War. Includes such movements as Abstract Expressionism, Neo-Dada, and Pop Art. Explores such artistic practices as performance art, feminist art, and conceptual art.

GE: AREA F

top


121D   African American Art and the African Legacy     MW   930-1045   SYNCHRONOUS     Ogbechie

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

This course examines the intersection of art, race, and identity in African-American arts and visual culture. It investigates the impact of an African legacy on African American identity, the role of race in the constitution of art narratives, the politics of representation in art, the constitution of social and cultural space, and notions of Diaspora identities in African-American art. It also analyzes key artists and discusses issues of gender and social class. Genres to be covered include Painting, Sculpture, Folk art, Film, Photography, Installation art, and Performance.

GE: AREA F, ETHNICITY

top


132I   Art of Empire     TR   1100-1215   SYNCHRONOUS WITH ASYNCHRONOUS MATERIALS     Khoury

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

Studies the visual culture of different empires, alone or in a comparative fashion. For example, Ottoman and Hapsburg; Ottoman, Safavid, and Mughal; Mughal and British India; or the earlier empire of the Fatimids, Abbasids, and Umayyads of Syria and Spain.

GE: AREA F

top


136C   Architecture of the United States     TR   930-1045   ASYNCHRONOUS; ONE WEEKLY SYNCHRONOUS MEETING (R  930-1045)     White

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

This course examines the history of architecture and urban planning in North America, focusing primarily on the geography of the United States. It is a study of architects and builders, patrons and occupants, as well as the historical forces and events that transformed the landscape.  Art, design, engineering, economics, and politics are the subjects of this course, with special emphasis on the way these interact to create an outlook or world view.  This course is as much about culture as it is about the space of culture.

GE: AREA F

top


138B   Contemporary Photography     TR   200-315   ASYNCHRONOUS     McLemore

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

American and European post-World War II photography considered as a living art form.

GE: AREA F

top


138C   Social Documentary Photography     TR   330-445   ASYNCHRONOUS     McLemore

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

This course takes seriously Susan Sontag's question "is it possible to be educated by photography?" In doing so, it will explore photography's role as a record, document, and evidence; and as a visual argument. Focusing on the mid-19th century to the present-day, it will address photographic representations of US western expansion, war, violence, poverty, politics, and national and global events. Throughout the course, we ask how and why we look to documentary photography as a way of understanding the past and present and what constitutes photographic knowledge?

GE: AREA F

top


141D   Birth of the Modern Museum     MW   200-315   SYNCHRONOUS     Paul

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

Course examines the emergence and development of museums of art in eighteenth-century Europe, tracing their origins to the private collections from which they evolved and studying the practices, such as tourism, that stimulated their growth.

GE: AREA F

top


141MH    Museums and History     MW   1230-145   MOSTLY ASYNCHRONOUS     Pardo Gaviria
     Topic: The Americas on Display

Recommended Preparation: ARTHI 5B
Prerequisite: Designed for majors.

The Americas on Display explores the history of art produced in Latin America since the beginning of the twentieth century as has been publicly displayed for museum visitors. Examining the museum’s engagement with history, we will explore curatorial strategies for telling stories through art objects. By asking how selected artists and artworks give account of colonial and de-colonial processes, in this course we will examine how the exhibition of art objects and images, at specific places and in particular times, have consolidated what is today recognized as the art of the Americas.

top


186A/293D   Seminar in Research Methods     W   1100-150   SYNCHRONOUS     Gidding
     Topic: Methods in Digital Art History

Prerequisite: upper-division standing.

This seminar will review a digital humanistic method each week. The course will include discussions of tools such as RTI, 3D scanning and XRF, and computational methods such as network analysis and GIS.

top


186O   Seminar in Latin American Art     W   200-450   SYNCHRONOUS     Clarke
     Topic: Art and Animate Matter: Visual Culture in the Classic Maya World

Prerequisite: upper-division standing.
May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 8 units with different topic. Open only to History of Art & Architecture majors during Pass 1.

From AD 250 until 850 the Maya of the Yucatan peninsula developed one of the world’s great civilizations, with a sophisticated writing system, urban dwellings, and courtly society. Over the last few decades, the decipherment of Maya script has advanced considerably, presenting access to past mentalities that inform us of their ideas and relationships with the material world. In this seminar, we will integrate these lines of evidence into art historical frameworks. Offering a powerful complement and counterpoint to archaeological data, we will situate cultural logics, resource relationships, and embodied or layered meanings within our interpretations of Classic Maya visual culture.

top


186RS/282A   Seminar in Chinese Art     R   400-650   SYNCHRONOUS     Sturman
     Topic: Trauma and Memory—Art after Dynastic Collapse

Prerequisite: upper-division standing.
Open only to History of Art & Architecture majors during Pass 1.

The seminar will examine painting produced following the collapse of the Ming dynasty in 1644 and during the slow consolidation of power by the Manchus in the latter half of the seventeenth century. Recognizing that outside the simplistic and monolithic category of allegiance existed a large gray zone of emotional and operative responses, we will look to see how painters utilized their craft to voice identity and forge meaning. China’s seventeenth century is an exceptionally rich period for Chinese painting, mirroring the complexity and drama of its history. We will examine a number of the most renowned artists, including Chen Hongshou 陳洪綬 (1598-1652), Gong Xian 龔賢 (1618-1689), Xiang Shengmo 項聖謨 (1597-1658), and Bada Shanren 八大山人 (1626-1705) to understand how irony, alienation, wit and humor could be employed through word and image to mask or channel emotion.

There are no prerequisites for the seminar, though background knowledge of Chinese art would be helpful. There will be weekly readings and discussion accompanied by close looking and analysis. Students will work on a final project for a paper and presentation.

GE: WRITING

top


186SS   Seminar in Architectural History & Urbanism     W   800-1050   SYNCHRONOUS & ASYNCHRONOUS     Chattopadhyay
     Topic: Building the Modern World

Prerequisite: upper-division standing.
May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 8 units. Open only to History of Art & Architecture majors during Pass 1.

Students in this undergraduate seminar will study the architecture of the long nineteenth century by working on a digital project: Building the Modern World Keywords. The long nineteenth century was foundational to the modern world. Colonialism, long-distance trade, capitalism, slavery, plantation economy, and the industrial revolution connected distant parts of the world, wreaked havoc, destroyed landscapes as well as economies and livelihoods, generated new ways of thinking about buildings, cities and landscapes, and gave rise to new spaces, new technologies and new publics. New building types such as the railway station and tall office building were created. A host of terms from slum to City Beautiful were coined during this time, and other terms given a new turn to describe and comprehend the emergence of new social and spatial relations. Students will work individually and in groups and learn how to conduct research, write keywords, select appropriate visual and media content to accompany each keyword, and publish on a digital platform.

top


187Z   Museum Studies Seminar     R   200-450   SYNCHRONOUS     Pardo Gaviria
     Topic: A History of Exhibitions in Latin America

Prerequisite: upper-division standing; History of Art & Architecture majors only.
Open only to History of Art & Architecture majors during Pass 1. May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 12 units.

This course explores the history of modern and contemporary art by tracing watershed exhibitions—the public exposition of artists, artworks, and ideas—that have taken place in the Americas. The exhibitions include both state-sponsored and privately-organized events for the display of artistic objects produced around the globe and presented for local audiences, and enable us to examine a range of historical, theoretical, and practical issues with which the field of Museum Studies is engaged. What was exhibited? Where? And for whom? These questions will guide our conversations about the Week of Modern Art in Brazil in 1922, the Havana Biennial in Cuba in 1993, and PST: Los Angeles/Latin America in 2017, among other art exhibitions.

GE: WRITING

top


253D   Topics in Medieval Architecture & Sculpture     M   200-450   SYNCHRONOUS     Badamo
     Topic: Living Monuments

Prerequisite: graduate standing.

Over the past few decades, the investigation of premodern monuments has evolved to consider the dynamic nature of sites and spaces. Scholars no longer treat buildings as static examples of architectural types, frozen in time at their moment of creation. Instead, they study buildings over the longue durée, beginning with the assumption that buildings exist in a continual state of creation – transformed through modern preservation, interaction with broader environments, and user engagement.

This seminar will provide a selective survey of new approaches to premodern architecture. It begins with an investigation of issues around historic preservation (the creation of the historic monument; the politics of nostalgia; ruins and modernity), then moves onto methods for historicizing and analyzing premodern sites. We will consider buildings in their broader environments (soundscapes, sightlines), the activation of architecture by users (graffiti, rituals), the gendering of spaces, and the use of architecture for mediating relationships between ethnic majorities and minorities. These topics will necessarily touch on questions of racism, colonialism, and non-western knowledge. Readings will include modern theory, art historical studies, and works from related disciplines. Specific case studies will be pulled from premodern Eurasia.

Rather than writing a traditional research paper, students will create a project proposal/prospectus based on a topic of your choosing. Students are encouraged to select a topic from their own area, using the methodologies and issues investigated in this course.

top


254   Topics in Pre-Columbian/Colonial Latin American Art     R   930-1220   SYNCHRONOUS     Caplan
     Topic: Mexican Manuscripts, Chicanx Codices

Prerequisite: graduate standing.

Taught with an upcoming exhibition by Sandy Rodriguez at the AD&A Museum, this graduate seminar looks at Mexican manuscript traditions with a transhistorical and transnational lens. Putting the work of Rodriguez and select Chicanx artists into conversation with 15th–16th century Mexican manuscripts, we will examine how contemporary works provide situated understandings of major themes, including Indigenous knowledge, colonialism, borders, ethnobotany, and materiality. We will also foreground Chicanx artists’ use of this history as a source of knowledge and power in confronting modern issues. Students’ final project will be interpretive texts to be featured in the exhibition.

top


282A/186RS   Topics on East Asian Art     R   400-650   SYNCHRONOUS     Sturman
     Topic: Trauma and Memory—Art after Dynastic Collapse

Prerequisite: graduate standing.

The seminar will examine painting produced following the collapse of the Ming dynasty in 1644 and during the slow consolidation of power by the Manchus in the latter half of the seventeenth century. Recognizing that outside the simplistic and monolithic category of allegiance existed a large gray zone of emotional and operative responses, we will look to see how painters utilized their craft to voice identity and forge meaning. China’s seventeenth century is an exceptionally rich period for Chinese painting, mirroring the complexity and drama of its history. We will examine a number of the most renowned artists, including Chen Hongshou 陳洪綬 (1598-1652), Gong Xian 龔賢 (1618-1689), Xiang Shengmo 項聖謨 (1597-1658), and Bada Shanren 八大山人 (1626-1705) to understand how irony, alienation, wit and humor could be employed through word and image to mask or channel emotion.

There are no prerequisites for the seminar, though background knowledge of Chinese art would be helpful. There will be weekly readings and discussion accompanied by close looking and analysis. Students will work on a final project for a paper and presentation. Graduate students will have an additional time slot for discussion of advanced readings.

top


293D/186A   Topics in Research Methods     W   1100-150   SYNCHRONOUS     Gidding
     Topic: Methods in Digital Art History

Prerequisite: graduate standing.

This seminar will review a digital humanistic method each week. The course will include discussions of tools such as RTI, 3D scanning and XRF, and computational methods such as network analysis and GIS.

top