2016-2017 Courses - Winter

Undergraduate

1   Introduction to Art - Paul
6B   Art Survey II: Renaissance - Baroque - Badamo
6DW   Survey: Arts of Japan and Korea - Wattles
6F   Survey: Architecture and Planning - Wittman
6K   Survey: Islamic Art & Architecture - Khoury

103D   Introduction to Classical Archaeology - Moser
103F   Greek Art and Archaeology - Moser
107A   Painting in the Fifteenth-Century Netherlands - Meadow
109F   Italian Journeys - Williams   [CANCELLED]
117C   Nineteenth-Century British Art and Culture - Bermingham
120BB   Special Topics in Twentieth-Century Modern Art: Visual Culture and Revolution - Monahan
121B   Reconstruction, Renaissance, and Realism in American Art: 1860 - 1900 - Garfinkle
132J    Modern Art of the Arab World - Khoury
134C   Chinese Painting I - Sturman
136W   Introduction to 2D/3D Visualizations in Architecture - White   [cross-listed with ART 106W]
186D   Seminar in Medieval Architecture & Sculpture: History, War, and Representation - Badamo
186G   Seminar in Seventeenth Century Northern European Art: Johannes Vermeer: The Art Behind the Art - Adams
186L/261A   Seminar in Art of the Americas: Radical Bodies and the 1960s - Robertson
187H   Museums in Transition: From the Early Modern to the Modern Period: Toward a Museum of Presences - Buono
187Z   Museum Studies Seminar: House Museum Movement in the USA - White

Graduate

255G   Studies in the History and Theory of Museums: Toward a Museum of Presences - Buono
261A/186L   Topics in American Art: Radical Bodies and the 1960s - Robertson
263   Topics in Contemporary Art: Contemporary Art Criticism - Sorkin
265   Topics in Architectural History & Urbanism: Architectural Theory (1800-1939) - Wittman
297   Getty Consortium: Art and Anthropology: The Agency of Objects


1   Introduction to Art     MW   1100-1215   IV THEATER 2     Paul

This course is intended for students who have not taken classes in the History of Art and Architecture, and may or may not do so again. It is designed to develop basic visual skills and introduce students to the wide range of issues, works, and themes with which the History of Art and Architecture is engaged, varying from year to year. NOTE: Not open to History of Art & Architecture majors.

GE: AREA F
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION
     HONORS SECTION:   F   1200-1250   ARTS 2622

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6B   Art Survey II: Renaissance - Baroque     TR   200-315   IV THEATER 1     Badamo

A survey of Renaissance and Baroque art in northern and southern Europe.

GE: AREA E, AREA F, EUROPEAN TRADITIONS, WRITING
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION
     HONORS SECTION:   T   400-450   ARTS 2324

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6DW   Survey: Arts of Japan and Korea     TR   500-615   BUCHANAN 1930     Wattles

Surveys the arts of Japan and the Korean peninsula from pre-historic to contemporary times. The focus is on the evolving role of the artist within society.

GE: AREA F, WORLD CULTURES, WRITING
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION

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6F   Survey: Architecture and Planning     TR   500-615   TD-WEST 1701     Wittman

This course offers a wide-ranging introduction to architecture and urban design from the earliest human constructions to the middle of the 20th century. The focus is decidedly global in the first half of the course, and more European in the second half. Students will encounter a variety of buildings and cities, but also different ways of understanding and studying them. Student writing assignments will involve the analysis of local architecture and town planning.

GE: AREA F, WRITING
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION

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6K     Survey: Islamic Art & Architecture     TR   930-1045   BUCHANAN 1930     Khoury

A survey of Islamic art and architecture.

GE: AREA F, WORLD CULTURES, WRITING
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION

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103D   Introduction to Classical Archaeology     MW   930-1045   ARTS 1341     Moser

Prerequisite: upper-division standing.

Introduces students to the field of Classical Archaeology through case studies drawn from all over the ancient world, with an emphasis on the Mediterranean. Explores both the practical methods of archaeology as well as the artifacts that are found and how they are preserved, displayed, and who owns them.

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103F   Greek Art and Archaeology     MW   1230-145   ARTS 1341     Moser

Prerequisite: upper-division standing.

Explores the ancient Greek world through art and archaeology — using art objects, architecture, and everyday artifacts to learn about ancient Greek society. Focuses on the history of Greek art, archaeology, and architecture from the Bronze Age through the Hellenistic period, and considers such themes as religion, politics, social status, and urban planning.

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107A   Painting in the Fifteenth-Century Netherlands     TR   930-1045   ARTS 1341     Meadow

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

Fifteenth-century Netherlandish paintings reproduced the visible world in exquisite detail. As this course will explore, this remarkable naturalism served many purposes: constructing social identities for this world, and taking viewers on journeys to heaven and hell beyond it. Some of the artists discussed include Van Eyck, Rogier, Bouts and Memling, among others.

GE: AREA F

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109F   Italian Journeys     Williams

[CANCELLED]

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117C   Nineteenth-Century British Art and Culture     TR   200-315   ARTS 1341     Bermingham

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

The course will study Victorian painting, photography, architecture and design as they relate to industrialism, urbanism, domesticity, landscape, and aestheticism. We will look closely at the work of the Pre-Raphaelites and their followers, at innovators in photography such as Fox Talbot, and Julia Margaret Cameron, at the Great Exhibition in the Crystal Palace, and at the impact of the Arts and Crafts movement. Period covered 1839 to 1900.

GE: AREA F

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120BB   Special Topics in Twentieth-Century Modern Art     TR   1100-1215   ARTS 1341     Monahan
     Topic: Visual Culture and Revolution

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.
May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 12 units provided letter designations are different.

Special topics in twentieth-century modern art.

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121B   Reconstruction, Renaissance, and Realism in American Art: 1860 - 1900     TR   1230-145   ARTS 1341     Garfinkle

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

Painting within the context of the human-made environment, from the onset of the Civil War to just before World War I, tracing the role of art in the rise of modern, corporate and industrial America.

GE: AREA F

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132J   Modern Art of the Arab World     MW   1100-1215   ARTS 1341     Khoury

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

Explores modern and contemporary art, artists and art movements of the Arab world from nineteenth century to the present.

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134C   Chinese Painting I     TR   330-445   ARTS 1341     Sturman

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

Chinese painting and theory, from beginnings through the fourteenth century. Introduction to major developments and masters in their cultural context with a focus on meaning and agency.

GE: AREA F, WORLD CULTURES

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136W   Introduction to 2D/3D Visualizations in Architecture     MW   900-1150   TD-WEST 1530     White
[cross-listed with ART 106W]

Prerequisite: upper-division standing; open to majors only.

Develops skills in reading, interpreting, and visualizing 3D objects and spaces by offering excercises in sketching, perspective, orthographic projections, isometric drawings, ad manual rendering practices. Relevant for thse interested in history of architecture, sculpture, and such spatial practices as installations and public art.

GE: AREA F

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186D   Seminar in Medieval Architecture & Sculpture     W   1200-250   ARTS 1332     Badamo
     Topic: History, War, and Representation

Prerequisite: upper-division standing.
May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 8 units with different topic. Open only to History of Art & Architecture majors during Pass 1.

Today we are saturated in images of war: on the news, the internet, and in films. What does it mean to be a spectator of such images? What are the cultural politics involved in the production, dissemination, and reception of images that document conflict? How does the type of media in which these images appear shape our perception of truth and reality? This course will situate the viewing of representations of war historically, paying particular attention to the role that different kinds of media play in establishing frames for how war can be understood.

GE: WRITING

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186G   Seminar in Seventeenth Century Northern European Art     R   100-350   ARTS 2622     Adams
     Topic: Johannes Vermeer: The Art Behind the Art

Prerequisite: upper-division standing.
May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 8 units with different topic. Open only to History of Art & Architecture majors during Pass 1.

Vermeer painted only 45 to 50 paintings over the course of his life, 34 of which survive. These provide an unparalled opportunity to examine in depth his complete surviving oeuvre in themes from ranging from the almost exclusive female subject matter to Vermeer’s biography. The course examines Vermeer’s paintings both as material objects and as visual images, specifically how the artist created what have been described as “stilled lives:” from the controversies that have arisen over his optical effects and possible use of the camera obscura raised most recently by David Hockney to his reputation from works passing under the names of other artists through his rediscovery and celebration in novel and movie. Finally, we locate his work in the context of life in Delft in the third quarter of the seventeenth century, patronage and the market, his predecessors, contemporaries, and the influence he has had on later artists.

GE: WRITING

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186L/261A   Seminar in Art of the Americas     T   200-450   ARTS 2622     Robertson
     Topic: Radical Bodies and the 1960s

Prerequisite: upper-division standing.
May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 8 units with different topic. Open only to History of Art & Architecture majors during Pass 1.

This seminar will use the exhibition, Radical Bodies: Anna Halprin, Simone Forti, and Yvonne Rainer in California and New York 1955-1972, to explore three issues. First, the specific role of dance in the radicalization and revolution in art making in the 1960s, across all media. Second, the consequence of the radicalized body for art making in the 1960s. And finally, how we might go about recovering the first responses to this explosion of new ideas and inter-media, so as to escape the subsequent canonization of certain figures and movements and open up this era for new scholarship.

In August 1960, on her dance deck north of San Francisco, Anna Halprin taught Simone Forti and Yvonne Rainer, along with a dozen other students, new ideas of improvisation around tasks, everyday movement, sound and the environment. Forti and Rainer took these ideas with them back to New York, and out of this encounter emerged Judson Dance Theater and other significant interventions in dance, the visual arts and music. The canonical version of this history begins in New York, and on the visual art side, is largely limited to a few, male artists. The history Radical Bodies tells starts in California, and insists on the importance of the fact that the players are women and Jewish.

How can we take this revisionary history and rethink Pop, Minimalism, Happenings, Performance, Conceptual art and all the other “movements” that occurred in this decade? How does dance history in particular force us to rethink the 1960s? That is what I would like us to consider in the seminar.

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187H   Museums in Transition: From the Early Modern to the Modern Period     W   500-750   ARTS 2622     Buono
     Topic: Toward a Museum of Presences

Prerequisite: upper-division standing.
May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 8 units with different topic. Open only to History of Art & Architecture majors during Pass 1.

This seminar examines the dual roles of presence and absence, of the tangible and the intangible, in the modern museum. Focusing on current debates in memory studies, material culture studies, and heritage studies, this seminar seeks to consider how museums and related institutions function within a variety of social and political contexts. Our case studies — including not just art museums but also police museums, indigenous museums, urban archaeological sites of slavery, memorials of trauma — will allow for an examination of the vast terrain of what museums have become. We will examine the complexities of the objects, spaces, and displays that museums contain, and the artworks they generate. Of particular interest is how museums generate the lived and imagined communities with which they interact. In this seminar, we will seek to ground our understanding both of the museum as an institution within a philosophy and epistemology of museums, and reflect on the position of museum studies within the discipline of art history.

GE: WRITING

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187Z   Museum Studies Seminar     W   300-550   ARTS 1332     White
     Topic: House Museum Movement in the USA

Prerequisite: upper-division standing; open to majors only.
May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 12 units. Open only to History of Art & Architecture majors during Pass 1.

This seminar will study the political and cultural history of the house museum in the United States, from its antebellum beginnings in the nineteenth century to the present. The course will focus on four landmark house museums: Mt. Vernon, Monticello, Orchard House, and the Booker T. Washington National Monument. We will briefly survey international examples, and the course will culminate with the study of a local example in Santa Barbara, the Casa de la Guerra.

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255G   Studies in the History and Theory of Museums     T   500-750   ARTS 2622     Buono
     Topic: Toward a Museum of Presences

Prerequisite: graduate standing.

This seminar examines the dual roles of presence and absence, of the tangible and the intangible, in the modern museum. Focusing on current debates in memory studies, material culture studies, and heritage studies, this seminar seeks to consider how museums and related institutions function within a variety of social and political contexts. Our case studies — including not just art museums but also police museums, indigenous museums, urban archaeological sites of slavery, memorials of trauma — will allow for an examination of the vast terrain of what museums have become. We will examine the complexities of the objects, spaces, and displays that museums contain, and the artworks they generate. Of particular interest is how museums generate the lived and imagined communities with which they interact. In this seminar, we will seek to ground our understanding both of the museum as an institution within a philosophy and epistemology of museums, and reflect on the position of museum studies within the discipline of art history.

Graduate students from all disciplines welcome. Please contact Dr. Amy Buono for further information: amybuono@mac.com.

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261A/186L   Topics in American Art     T   200-450   ARTS 2622     Robertson
     Topic: Radical Bodies and the 1960s

Prerequisite: graduate standing.

This seminar will use the exhibition, Radical Bodies: Anna Halprin, Simone Forti, and Yvonne Rainer in California and New York 1955-1972, to explore three issues. First, the specific role of dance in the radicalization and revolution in art making in the 1960s, across all media. Second, the consequence of the radicalized body for art making in the 1960s. And finally, how we might go about recovering the first responses to this explosion of new ideas and inter-media, so as to escape the subsequent canonization of certain figures and movements and open up this era for new scholarship.

In August 1960, on her dance deck north of San Francisco, Anna Halprin taught Simone Forti and Yvonne Rainer, along with a dozen other students, new ideas of improvisation around tasks, everyday movement, sound and the environment. Forti and Rainer took these ideas with them back to New York, and out of this encounter emerged Judson Dance Theater and other significant interventions in dance, the visual arts and music. The canonical version of this history begins in New York, and on the visual art side, is largely limited to a few, male artists. The history Radical Bodies tells starts in California, and insists on the importance of the fact that the players are women and Jewish.

How can we take this revisionary history and rethink Pop, Minimalism, Happenings, Performance, Conceptual art and all the other “movements” that occurred in this decade? How does dance history in particular force us to rethink the 1960s? That is what I would like us to consider in the seminar.

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263   Topics in Contemporary Art     M   330-620   ARTS 2622     Sorkin
     Topic: Contemporary Art Criticism

Prerequisite: graduate standing.

In a contemporary art world increasingly dependent upon conceptually-driven and text-based works of art, how does writing clarify, obscure, or become a work of art itself? What is the role of the critic in mediating this kind of writing? What are the responsibilities of the artist as an interpreter of ideas? As these roles have increasingly merged, this reading-intensive course will actively explore the history of post-1960s criticism through primary source texts as it emerged alongside the academic discipline of contemporary art history.

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265   Topics in Architectural History & Urbanism     R   200-450   ARTS 1332     Wittman
     Topic: Architectural Theory (1800-1939)

Prerequisite: graduate standing.

This will be an intensive reading course focused on primary sources in translation, mostly from Europe but with some American works towards the end. The central theme will concern how understandings of architecture's function and meaning shifted with the long emergence of a mass public. Other themes will include the emergence of new materials and technologies and the impact of imperialism and colonialism.

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297   Getty Consortium: Art and Anthropology: The Agency of Objects
Susan Dackerman, Getty Scholar and Adjunct Associate Professor of Art History, USC

Prerequisite: graduate standing; by application only (deadline: November 1, 2016).

Special graduate seminar offered at the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles, involving faculty and graduate students from the five graduate programs in Art History or Visual Studies located in southern California. For more information, visit the Getty Scholars Program site and view the Getty Consortium Seminar flyer .

F   1000-500   The Getty Research Institute
     Orientation: December 2, 2016
     Seminars: January 13, 20, 27; February 3, 10, 24; March 3, 10, 2017

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