2016-2017 Courses - Fall

Undergraduate

5A   Introduction to Architecture & Environment (of the Islamic World) - Overton
6A   Art Survey I: Ancient - Medieval - Moser
6DS   Survey: History of Art in China - Sturman
6G   Survey: History of Photography - Keller

107B   Painting in the 16th-Century Netherlands - Meadow
109G   Leonardo da Vinci: Art, Science, and Technology in Early Modern Italy - Williams   [CANCELLED]
111B   Dutch Art in the Age of Rembrandt and Frans Hals. The Birth of a Nation: 1579-1648 - Adams
111C   Dutch Art in the Age of Vermeer. The Golden Age: 1648-1672 - Adams
120AA   Special Topics in Twentieth-Century Modern Art: Outta Sight! Adventures in the Visual, 1960-1970 - Monahan
120BB   Special Topics in Twentieth-Century Modern Art: War and Trauma in Twentieth Century Art and Visual Culture - McLemore
121D   African American Art and the African Legacy   [CANCELLED]
127B   African Art II: Modern and Contemporary African Art - Lynch
130C   The Arts of Spain and New Spain - Spivak
136A   Nineteenth-Century Architecture - Chattopadhyay
141D   Birth of the Modern Museum - Paul
142D   Gardens, Land, and Landscape in the West: Renaissance to 1900 - Wittman
142E   Architecture, Planning, and Culture in Eighteenth-Century Paris - Wittman
186B   Seminar in Ancient Greek & Roman Art/Architecture: Roman Religion - Moser
186H   Seminar in Seventeenth Century Southern European Art: Caravaggio and Caravaggism - Paul
186T   Seminar in Photographic History - Keller

Graduate

200A   Proseminar: Introduction to Art-Historical Methods - Monahan
255A   Topics in Italian Renaissance Art - Williams   [CANCELLED]
261A   Topics in American Art - Robertson
265   Topics in Architectural History & Urbanism: Empire, City, and Material Culture - Chattopadhyay
282A   Topics on East Asian Art - Sturman


5A   Introduction to Architecture & Environment (of the Islamic World)     TR   500-615   BUCHANAN 1920     Overton

Architecture is the primeval act through which human beings carve out for themselves a place in nature. Initially a means of survival, place-making has developed throughout history into technically advanced and artistically sophisticated architectural designs that intertwine ever closer the man-made world with the natural one. This course introduces basic architectural construction methods, design strategies, and subject specific terminology, discusses various interpretative concepts, and poses questions after universal fundamentals of the multi-faceted and multi-sensory relationships between man, architecture, and nature.

GE: AREA F, WRITING
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION

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6A     Art Survey I: Ancient - Medieval     TR   1230-145    IV THEATER 1     Moser

History of Western art from its origins to the beginnings of the Renaissance.

GE: AREA E, AREA F, EUROPEAN TRADITIONS, WRITING
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION
     HONORS SECTION:   W   1100-1150   ARTS 2622

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6DS     Survey: History of Art in China     MW   500-615   TD-WEST 1701     Sturman

The History of Art in China is a survey course that introduces the major traditions and monuments of Chinese art from Neolithic times to the modern (20th-21st centuries). The course generally follows a chronological trajectory but with a thematic matrix. The first part of the course, from Neolithic to Han (ca. 5000 BC - AD 220) concerns the formation of culture and civilization and covers early pottery and bronze traditions as well as the beginnings of pictorial art. Objects and pictures are placed into their historical, philosophical, and social contexts. The second part of the course focuses on the importation and development of Buddhist art, from ca. AD 200 - 1000. The third part of the course interweaves the painting, calligraphy, and ceramic traditions of imperial China, from the Song dynasty to the near contemporary. Garden design and imperial architecture are also introduced. One of the aspects of the course that will be emphasized is regional diversity and intercultural encounters (India and Central Asia in particular). The title, History of Art in China, as opposed to something like The Arts of China, is intended to convey awareness of the fact art is a conceptual and subjective term and that objects have histories that extend beyond national borders.

GE: AREA F, WORLD CULTURES, WRITING
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION

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6G     Survey: History of Photography     TR   1100-1215   PSYCH 1924     Keller

A critical survey of nineteenth and twentieth century photography as an art form.

GE: AREA F, WRITING
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION

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107B   Painting in the 16th-Century Netherlands     TR   200-315   ARTS 1341     Meadow

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

Painting of the Low Countries from c. 1500 - c. 1600, placed in its social and cultural contexts. The Low Countries were one of the richest and most culturally sophisticated territories of Europe in the sixteenth century, and a major center of art production. The multicultural, international character of the Low Countries generated exciting new ideas and intense conflict, a situation in which the visual arts played a crucial role. We will focus on the connections among painting, print culture, science, politics, and religion, with a special emphasis on issues of social negotiation and self-fashioning.

GE: AREA F

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109G   Leonardo da Vinci: Art, Science, and Technology in Early Modern Italy     Williams

[CANCELLED]

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111B   Dutch Art in the Age of Rembrandt and Frans Hals. The Birth of a Nation: 1579-1648     MW   1100-1215   ARTS 1341     Adams

Prerequisite: one History of Art & Architecture course or equivalent. Not open to freshmen.

The first half of the seventeenth century in Holland, the period from the Union of Utrecht of 1579 and its declaration of independence from Spain, to the recognition of the Northern Netherlands as an independent nation in 1648, was the first part of a century that has come to be known as the Dutch "Golden Age" of Dutch art. This era witnessed the emergence of a Protestant mercantile culture in which the Catholic Church and the hereditary nobility were supplanted by democratic institutions and middle-class merchants as major patrons of the arts. These men and women supported such artists as Rembrandt van Rijn and Frans Hals as well as a host of lesser known masters who created images rooted in everyday life rather than the imaginary religious, historical, and mythological imagery of previous centuries. This course examines the cultural functions of this rich, apparently descriptive imagery as it helped to form the private identities and public ambitions of Europe's first middle-class capitalist society. We examine the aesthetics and content of this imagery through contemporary economic, historic, religious, and literary developments, and the emerging scientific revolution.

The emphasis in this class is upon the social and intellectual issues engaged by Dutch painting: how they participated in the struggle between the values of a new middle-class and capitalist culture in conflict with an older way of life. At the same time, it examines the varieties of art historical methods employed by contemporary scholars, as well as those of the past, to understand these images. The goal of the course is to give students a solid grounding in knowledge about seventeenth century Dutch art and culture, with a focus upon critical analysis of images as well as the structure of arguments that have been made about them. These skills are intended to be ones that you may be able to apply both in other courses, as well as information you encounter and arguments you construct in your daily life.

GE: AREA F

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111C   Dutch Art in the Age of Vermeer. The Golden Age: 1648-1672     TR   1100-1215   ARTS 1341     Adams

Prerequisite: one History of Art & Architecture course or equivalent. Not open to freshmen.

This class covers art produced during the second half of the seventeenth century in Holland. This was the period from the recognition of the Northern Netherlands as an independent nation in 1648 to the end of the so-called “Golden Age” with the invasion of the Lowlands by France in 1672. The era witnessed the flowering of a Protestant mercantile culture which rivaled the political and economic power of that of monarchs and aristocrats across Europe. These men and women supported such artists as Rembrandt van Rijn and Jan Vermeer as well as a host of lesser known masters who created images rooted everyday life. This course examines the cultural functions of this rich, apparently descriptive imagery as it helped to form the private identities and public ambitions of Europe's first middle-class capitalist society. We examine the aesthetics and content of this imagery through contemporary economic, historic, religious, and literary developments, and the emerging scientific revolution.

The emphasis in this class is upon the social and intellectual issues engaged by Dutch painting: how they participated in the struggle between the values of a new middle-class and capitalist culture in conflict with an older way of life. At the same time, it examines the varieties of art historical methods employed by contemporary scholars, as well as those of the past, to understand these images. The goal of the course is to give students a solid grounding in knowledge about seventeenth century Dutch art and culture, with a focus upon critical analysis of images as well as the structure of arguments that have been made about them. These skills are intended to be ones that you may be able to apply both in other courses, as well as information you encounter and arguments you construct in your daily life.

GE: AREA F

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120AA   Special Topics in Twentieth-Century Modern Art     TR   930-1045   ARTS 1341      Monahan
     Topic: Outta Sight!  Adventures in the Visual, 1960-1970

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.
May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 12 units provided letter designations are different.

What were the Sixties and what do they mean to us? Hippies, counter-culture, student protests, anti-war movement, pop art, rock music, drugs, and any number of images that come to mind when “the 60s” is mentioned. The period was marked by desire and divisiveness, and this course is designed to discover the important ways in which visual culture of the 1960s shaped both the United States and the United Kingdom.

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120BB   Special Topics in Twentieth-Century Modern Art     MW   200-315   ARTS 1341     McLemore
     Topic: War and Trauma in Twentieth Century Art and Visual Culture

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.
May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 12 units provided letter designations are different.

This course examines war and violence in art from World War I to the 9/11 attacks. Taking into account the works’ formal qualities, as well as their content and immediate context, we will attempt to understand trauma as a radical break with experience that complicates access to history and narrative, raise ethical issues about the aesthetics of violence, and ask whether the affect produced by art can justify the public use of private pain, and in what measure art can become a form of protest or understanding of violence.

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121D   African American Art and the African Legacy

[CANCELLED]

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127B   African Art II: Modern and Contemporary African Art     TR  1230-145   ARTS 1341     Lynch

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

This course provides an introduction to Modern and Contemporary African Art through an evaluation of its ideologies, forms and contexts of practice. It seeks a conceptual framework for evaluating modern and Contemporary African art that recognizes its unique conceptual/formal structure and also its location within an international discourse of art and visual culture. It focuses on different kinds of artworks produced by African artists in the 20th and early 21st Centuries and how these artists and they have been used to constructed modern, contemporary and African identities. It also investigates the the impact of curatorial practices and strategies of new media representation on the location of Africa in Global Contemporary Art.

GE: AREA F, WORLD CULTURES

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130C   The Arts of Spain and New Spain     MW   330-445   ARTS 1341     Spivak

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

From the Alhambra and Velázquez to the Virgin of Guadalupe, this course charts both the revolution of the arts in 16th and 17th century Spain and their influence and transformation in the visual culture of the New World. Special emphasis will be placed on the creative interaction of the European and indigenous traditions in the architecture, sculpture, painting and ritual practice of the colonial Americas.

GE: AREA F

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136A   Nineteenth-Century Architecture     MW   930-1045   ARTS 1341     Chattopadhyay

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

The history of architecture and planning beginning with eighteenth-century architectural trends in Europe and concluding with late nineteenth-century efforts to reform the city. Exploration of the culture of nineteenth-century modernity through architecture and urban design centered around the themes of industrialization, colonialism, and the idea of landscape. The scope is global.

GE: AREA F

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141D   Birth of the Modern Museum     MW   1230-145   ARTS 1341     Paul

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

Course examines the emergence and development of museums of art in eighteenth-century Europe, tracing their origins to the private collections from which they evolved and studying the practices, such as tourism, that stimulated their growth.

GE: AREA F

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142D   Gardens, Land, and Landscape in the West: Renaissance to 1900     TR   330-445   ARTS 1341     Wittman

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

This course will cover Italian Renaissance gardens, 17th-century French formal gardens (including Versailles), 18th-century picturesque gardens in England (from Stourhead and Stowe to Capability Brown), and the urban parks of 19th-century Paris, London and New York, up to the development of the suburban ideal. Focus on how these different spaces each reflect the changes in attitudes towards land and nature wrought by the West's long transition from feudalism to industrial capitalism.

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142E   Architecture, Planning, and Culture in Eighteenth-Century Paris     TR   1230-145   NORTH HALL 1105     Wittman

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

Paris (and Versailles) from the Sun King to the Revolution, rococo, neoclassicism, origins of urbanism; extensive use of primary texts in translation to study architectural debates in the press and their connection to contemporary political battles.

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186B     Seminar in Ancient Greek & Roman Art/Architecture     TR   930-1045   ARTS 2622     Moser
     Topic: Roman Religion

Prerequisite: upper-division standing.
May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 8 units with different topic. Open only to History of Art & Architecture majors during Pass 1.

What can architecture and archaeology tell us about religious practice in the city of Rome? How are ritual activities influenced by sanctuary architecture and the topography of the surrounding city? And, conversely, how does the Roman cityscape respond to religion?  This course will answer these and related questions as we explore more general topics and themes in the study of Roman religion from the Republican through Imperial periods. By confining ourselves geographically to the city of Rome we will address important questions of local religious continuity and adaptation in an integrated urban setting.

GE: WRITING

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186H     Seminar in Seventeenth Century Southern European Art     R   1100-150   ARTS 2622     Paul
     Topic: Caravaggio and Caravaggism

Prerequisite: upper-division standing.
May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 8 units with different topic. Open only to History of Art & Architecture majors during Pass 1.

Advanced studies in seventeenth century art. Topics will vary. Requires weekly readings and discussion, and the writing of a research seminar paper.

GE: WRITING

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186T   Seminar in Photographic History     M   200-450   ARTS 2622     Keller

Prerequisite: upper-division standing.
May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 8 units with different topic. Open only to History of Art & Architecture majors during Pass 1.

Advanced studies in photographic history. Topics will vary. This course requires weekly readings and discussion, and the writing of a research seminar paper.

GE: WRITING

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200A   Proseminar: Introduction to Art-Historical Methods     W   930-1220   ARTS 1332      Monahan

Prerequisite: graduate standing.

Introduction to art-historical methods, with emphasis on the historical development of current practices, critical theory, debates within the field, and cross-disciplinary dialogues.

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255A     Topics in Italian Renaissance Art     Williams

[CANCELLED]

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261A   Topics in American Art     T   1100-150   ARTS 2622     Robertson

Prerequisite: graduate standing or senior History of Art & Architecture majors with consent of instructor.

Special research in American painting and sculpture, 1700 - 1950.

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265   Topics in Architectural History & Urbanism     M     1230-320     ARTS 1332     Chattopadhyay
     Topic: Empire, City, and Material Culture

Prerequisite: graduate standing.

Taking various forms of material culture — buildings, landscapes, foodways, and consumer products — as sites of analysis, this seminar will examine the role of colonialism and empire in producing the urban experience. We will read key texts on empire and modern urbanism, attending to those aspects of urban history that we often miss when we see large-scale phenomena such as empires and cities through a macro analytic gaze. We will pay attention to some seemingly small things that might open windows onto larger phenomena.

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282A   Topics on East Asian Art     R     200-250     ARTS 1214     Sturman

Prerequisite: graduate standing.

Research on select problems on the arts of China, Japan, or Korea.

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