2017-2018 Courses - Winter

(tentative; updated 12/12/2017)

Undergraduate

1   Introduction to Art - McLemore
5B   Introduction to Museum Studies - Robertson
6B   Art Survey II: Renaissance - Baroque - Dini
6G   Survey: History of Photography - Keller
6J   Survey: Contemporary Architecture - White

103G   Ancient Spectacle - Moser
105O   The Global Middle Ages: Visual and Cultural Encounters in the Medieval Mediterranean - Badamo
109A   Italian Renaissance Art: 1400 - 1500 - Williams   [CANCELLED]
109E   Michelangelo - Williams   [CANCELLED]
111B   Dutch Art in the Age of Rembrandt - Zumaya
119E   Early Twentieth Century European Art, 1900 - 1945 - Monahan
132J   Modern Art of the Arab World - Khoury
134D   Art and Modern China - TBA   [CANCELLED]
136W   Introduction to 2D/3D Visualizations in Architecture - White   [cross-listed with ART 106W]
138G   The Social Production of Art: Patrons, Dealers, Critics, Museums - Keller
141G   The Architecture of Museums and Galleries from c. 1800 to the Present - Welter
141H   Curating Contemporary Art - Sorkin
141MH   Special Topics in Museum Studies: Museums and History - McLemore
144C   Contemporary Art in Russia and Eastern Europe - Spieker   [cross-listed with SLAV 130C]
148A   Contemporary Art History: 1960 - 2000 - Sorkin
186N   Seminar in African Art - Ogbechie
186SV/267   Seminar in Modern Architecture: Architecture and Biography - Welter
187Z   Museum Studies Seminar: PST LA/LA: New Visions of Latin American Art - Buono

Graduate

200A   Proseminar: Introduction to Art-Historical Methods - Chattopadhyay
253D   Topics in Medieval Architecture & Sculpture - Badamo
267/186SV   Topics in Modern Architecture: Architecture and Biography - Welter
297   Getty Graduate Consortium: Iconoclasm and Vandalism: Iconoclasm as Method


1   Introduction to Art     MW   330-445   IV THEATER 2     McLemore

This course is intended for students who have not taken classes in the History of Art and Architecture, and may or may not do so again. It is designed to develop basic visual skills and introduce students to the wide range of issues, works, and themes with which the History of Art and Architecture is engaged, varying from year to year. NOTE: Not open to History of Art & Architecture majors.

GE: AREA F
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION
     HONORS SECTION:   W   100-150   ARTS 2622

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5B   Introduction to Museum Studies     TR   1100-1215   HSSB 1174     Robertson

Designed to introduce students to various aspects of Museum Studies — historical, theoretical, and practical — by examining a range of issues and topics with which the field is engaged.

GE: AREA F
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION

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6B   Art Survey II: Renaissance - Baroque     TR   200-315   IV THEATER 1     Dini

A survey of Renaissance and Baroque art in northern and southern Europe.

GE: AREA E, AREA F, EUROPEAN TRADITIONS, WRITING
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION
     HONORS SECTION:   R   1000-1050   ARTS 2622

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6G     Survey: History of Photography     TR   930-1045   HSSB 1174     Keller

A critical survey of nineteenth and twentieth century photography as an art form.

GE: AREA F, WRITING
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION

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6J   Survey: Contemporary Architecture     MW   200-315   BUCHANAN 1930     White

Global survey of architectural production in the twenty-first century. Emphasis on form and technology, as well as economic, sociopolitical context. Explores built form at a variety of scales (buildings, cities, virtual spaces) as well as the concept of a "contemporary."

GE: AREA F
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION

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103G   Ancient Spectacle     MW   1230-145   ARTS 1341     Moser

Prerequisite: upper-division standing.

Explores the worlds of ancient Greece and Rome through the participants in and observers of a variety of spectacles in the ancient world. Examines public spectacles such as bull-leaping, Olympic games, theatrical performances, gladiatorial combats, naval battles, religious rituals, and military triumphs, as well as other more private spectacles such as dinner parties with the gods.

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105O   The Global Middle Ages: Visual and Cultural Encounters in the Medieval Mediterranean     TR   930-1045   ARTS 1341     Badamo

Prerequisite: upper-division standing.

Focusing on the Mediterranean, this course considers visual manifestations of exchange. Its goal is to examine the complexity of religious, political, and visual interactions in the Middle Ages, a period that brought together diverse religious communities, generating both social frictions and new cultural forms. Students will study the dynamic interplay among Christian, Jewish, and Islamic visual cultures as they developed and coalesced through commerce, gift exchange, the reinterpretation of pre-existing forms, and the reuse of objects and spaces.

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109A   Italian Renaissance Art: 1400 - 1500     TR   330-445   TD-WEST 2600     Williams

   [CANCELLED]

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109E   Michelangelo     MW   330-445   TD-WEST 2600     Williams

   [CANCELLED]

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111B   Dutch Art in the Age of Rembrandt     TR   500-615   ARTS 1341     Zumaya

Prerequisite: one History of Art & Architecture course or equivalent. Not open to freshmen.

Visual culture produced in Northern Netherlands between 1579 and 1648. Classes devoted to individual artists (e.g. Rembrandt, Frans Hals) and genres (e.g. landscapes, portraiture, history painting) in relation to material culture and thought of the period.

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119E   Early Twentieth Century European Art, 1900 - 1945     MW   930-1045   ARTS 1341     Monahan

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

Introduction to the major movements of European modern art in the first half of the twentieth century. This course critically addresses the formation of avant-garde groups and movements in relation to political and social issues.

GE: AREA F

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132J   Modern Art of the Arab World     TR   1100-1215   ARTS 1341     Khoury

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

Explores modern and contemporary art, artists and art movements of the Arab world from nineteenth century to the present.

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134D   Art and Modern China     TR   330-445   ARTS 1341     TBA

   [CANCELLED]

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136W   Introduction to 2D/3D Visualizations in Architecture     MW   800-1050   TD-WEST 1530     White
[cross-listed with ART 106W]

Prerequisite: upper-division standing; open to majors only.

Develops skills in reading, interpreting, and visualizing 3D objects and spaces by offering excercises in sketching, perspective, orthographic projections, isometric drawings, ad manual rendering practices. Relevant for thse interested in history of architecture, sculpture, and such spatial practices as installations and public art.

GE: AREA F

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138G   The Social Production of Art: Patrons, Dealers, Critics, Museums    TR   1230-145   ARTS 1341     Keller

Prerequisite: Two prior upper-division History of Art & Architecture courses.

In contrast to the usual focus on the artist's creative activity, this course explores the crucial contributions made to the production of art by agencies such as markets, museums, exhibitions, reproductions, criticism, patronship, advertisement, etc.

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141G   The Architecture of Museums and Galleries from c. 1800 to the Present     TR   200-315   ARTS 1341     Welter

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

Discusses the history of museums and galleries as distinct modern building types by analyzing their architectural developments from approximately 1800 to the present. Beside architectural design issues (sequence of galleries, display of exhibits, lighting, visitor routes, etc.), the course analyzes museums as sites of memory, their intersections with the modern city, and their roles in cultural and societal debates. Geographically, the course focuses on both the museum’s origin in Europe and its contemporary universal presence.

GE: AREA F, EUROPEAN TRADITIONS, WRITING

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141H    Curating Contemporary Art     MW   500-615   ARTS 1332     Sorkin

Prerequisite: upper-division standing; enrollment by instructor approval only.

Examines the history and practices of curating exhibitions and other forms of contemporary curatorial practice; expands the field by including diversepractices as educational programming, large-scale collaborations, and the commissioning of art works. Considers both institutional and independent programming, with the focus from the 1960s to the present. How do curatorial projects produce meaning? How do they conceive, shape and create communicative spaces? What kind of authorship do they imply?

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141MH    Special Topics in Museum Studies     MW    200-315   ARTS 1341     McLemore
     Topic: Museums and History

Recommended Preparation: ARTHI 5B.
Enrollment Comments: Designed for majors.
Prerequisite: not open to freshman.
Not open to students who completed ARTHI 120CC in Spring 2017.

This course will examine the 20th century museum’s engagement with history. We will explore curatorial strategies for telling stories about the past through historical objects, written narratives, photography, performance, architecture, and art. The course will be organized around a series of case studies including the newly-opened African American History Museum in Washington DC; the Holocaust museums in Washington DC and Berlin, Germany; the Military History Museum in Dresden, Germany; the War Remnants Museum (previously the Exhibition House for Crimes of War and Aggression) in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam; and the Manzanar National Historical Site in Manzanar, California. Throughout the course, we will consider how political and national climates, and curatorial and community agendas, shape how history is told within the context of the museum.

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144C   Contemporary Art in Russia and Eastern Europe     W   500-750   ARTS 1341     Speiker
[cross-listed with SLAV 130C]

Prerequisite: upper-division standing.
Not open for credit to students who have completed Russian 144C or Slavic 144C.

The class examines contemporary art in Russia, including art made by Russian artists abroad. Given Russia’s unusual geo-political situation and its communist past, the country represents a fascinating example of a country both inside and outside of the international art market. No knowledge of contemporary art is required for attending this course. Taught in English.

GE: AREA E, AREA F

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148A    Contemporary Art History: 1960 - 2000     MW   1100-1215   ARTS 1341     Sorkin

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

Study of recent artistic developments from 1960 until 2000. Movements studied include minimalism, conceptual art, earthworks, feminist art, AIDS activism, identity politics, the use of new media and technology (video, digital media) in contemporary art, along with issues related to sexuality and difference.

GE: AREA E, AREA F

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186N   Seminar in African Art     T   1200-250   ARTS 2622     Ogbechie

Prerequisite: upper-division standing.
May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 8 units with different topic. Open only to History of Art & Architecture majors during Pass 1.

Advanced studies in African art. Topics will vary. This course requires weekly readings and discussion, and the writing of a research seminar paper.

GE: WRITING

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186SV/267   Seminar in Modern Architecture     T   900-1150   ARTS 2622     Welter
     Topic: Architecture and Biography

Prerequisite: upper-division standing.
May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 8 units. Open only to History of Art & Architecture majors during Pass 1.

A close, if not causal relationship between architecture and biography, character, and even personality has often been stated by such architects, designers, and critics, as John Ruskin, Andrew Jackson Downing, and Aaron Betsky for example.

Researching the archives, œuvre, and lives of three gay architects who practiced in the mid-to late twentieth century mostly in SoCal — Jim Charlton (1919-1998), Victor Cusack (born 1915), and William Alexander Levy (1909-1997) — this seminar explores the nexus between the biographies of both architects and clients and the architectural works they designed, respectively commissioned.

The archives of the three architects are part of the Architecture & Design Collection, UCSB, where some of the class meetings will be held. Participants commit to conduct research in the ADC and write a research paper. Limited spaces available. E-mail: welter@arthistory.ucsb.edu.

GE: WRITING

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187Z   Museum Studies Seminar     F   900-1150   ARTS 2622     Buono
     Topic: PST LA/LA: New Visions of Latin American Art

Prerequisite: upper-division standing; enrollment by instructor approval only.
May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 12 units. Open only to History of Art & Architecture majors during Pass 1.
Recommended Preparation: ARTHI 5B: Intro to Museum Studies and/or ARTHI 6H: Pre-Columbian Art

In Winter 2018, this advanced undergraduate seminar will offer a unique and exciting opportunity to visit three groundbreaking exhibitions of Latin American and Latinx art in Los Angeles, all part of the Getty’s Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA initiative. Our case studies — Axé Bahia: The Power of Art in an Afro-Brazilian Metropolis (Fowler Museum, UCLA), Painted in Mexico, 1700-1790: Pinxit Mexico (Los Angeles County Museum of Art), and Making Art Concrete: Works from Argentina and Brazil in the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros (Getty Center) — explore issues of identity, community and materiality in Latin America across a broad historical and geographic range. We will get a behind the scenes look at these exhibitions, meeting with their curators and designers. Through selected readings and lively discussions, our goal will be to understand the diverse sites and spaces that constitute Latin American Art, and consider the ways in which exhibition practices and institutional initiatives shape these canons. The seminar will include a workshop in which students will learn how to write historically grounded exhibitions critiques, which will be the written assignment for the seminar.

GE: WRITING

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200A   Proseminar: Introduction to Art-Historical Methods     M   900-1150   ARTS 2622      Chattopadhyay

Prerequisite: graduate standing.

Introduction to art-historical methods, with emphasis on the historical development of current practices, critical theory, debates within the field, and cross-disciplinary dialogues.

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253D   Topics in Medieval Architecture and Sculpture     R   1100-150   ARTS 2622     Badamo

Prerequisite: graduate standing.

Special research in Romanesque and/or Gothic architecture and sculpture.

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267/186SV   Topics in Modern Architecture     T   900-1150   ARTS 2622     Welter
     Topic: Architecture and Biography

Prerequisite: graduate standing.

A close, if not causal relationship between architecture and biography, character, and even personality has often been stated by such architects, designers, and critics, as John Ruskin, Andrew Jackson Downing, and Aaron Betsky for example.

Researching the archives, œuvre, and lives of three gay architects who practiced in the mid-to late twentieth century mostly in SoCal — Jim Charlton (1919-1998), Victor Cusack (born 1915), and William Alexander Levy (1909-1997) — this seminar explores the nexus between the biographies of both architects and clients and the architectural works they designed, respectively commissioned.

The archives of the three architects are part of the Architecture & Design Collection, UCSB, where some of the class meetings will be held. Participants commit to conduct research in the ADC and write a research paper. Limited spaces available. E-mail: welter@arthistory.ucsb.edu.

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297   Getty Graduate Consortium: Iconoclasm and Vandalism: Iconoclasm as Method
Alka Patel, Getty Scholar and Associate Professor of Art History & PhD Program in Visual Studies, UC Irvine

Prerequisite: graduate standing; by application only (deadline: November 1, 2017).

Special graduate seminar offered at the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles, involving faculty and graduate students from the five graduate programs in Art History or Visual Studies located in southern California. For more information about the theme and application process, visit the Getty Scholars Program site or view the Consortium flyer .

F   1000-500   The Getty Research Institute
     Orientation: December 1, 2017
     Seminars: January 12, 19, 26; February 2, 9, 23; March 2, 9, 2018

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