2016-2017 Courses - Spring

Undergraduate

5B   Introduction to Museum Studies - Robertson
6C   Art Survey III: Modern - Contemporary - Sorkin
6E   Survey: Arts of Africa, Oceania, and Native North America - Lynch
6H   Survey: The Arts of Precolumbian America - Spivak
6J   Survey: Contemporary Architecture - White

105O   The Global Middle Ages: Visual and Cultural Encounters in the Medieval Mediterranean - Badamo
105P   Introduction to Medieval Art and Architecture - Badamo
113B   Seventeenth Century Art in Italy I - Paul
119E   Early Twentieth Century European Art, 1900 - 1945 - Monahan
120CC   Special Topics in Twentieth-Century Modern Art: Museums and History - McLemore
121C   Twentieth-Century American Art: Modernism and Pluralism, 1900 - Present - Garfinkle
130D   Pre-Columbian Art of South America - Spivak
133EE   Special Topics in Islamic Art: Islam & Image - Khoury
134E   The Art of the Chinese Landscape - Sturman
134J   Understanding Manga - Wattles
185AE   Special Topics in Art History: Art and its Environments in Brazil - Buono
185TC   Special Topics in Art History: Transoceanic Visions: Art of the Portuguese Global Empire - Buono
186Q   Seminar in Islamic Art and Architecture - Khoury
186RW/282B   Seminar in Japanese Art: Patterns & Paste: Japanese Stencil Art, circa 1966 - Wattles

Graduate

282A   Topics on East Asian Art - Sturman
282B/186RW   Topics of Japanese Art: Patterns & Paste: Japanese Stencil Art, circa 1966 - Wattles
296A   Reading Critical Theory and the Visual Arts: Art and Literature and the Object, from 1960 to the Present - Spieker


5B   Introduction to Museum Studies     TR   800-915   HSSB 1174     Robertson

Designed to introduce students to various aspects of Museum Studies — historical, theoretical, and practical — by examining a range of issues and topics with which the field is engaged.

GE: AREA F
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION

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6C   Art Survey III: Modern - Contemporary     TR   1100-1215   IV THEATER 1     Sorkin

History of Western art from the eighteenth century to the present.

GE: AREA E, AREA F, EUROPEAN TRADITIONS, WRITING
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION
     HONORS SECTION:  R   200-250   ARTS 1332

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6E   Survey: Arts of Africa, Oceania, and Native North America     MW   1230-145   BUCHANAN 1930     Lynch

This course provides a general introduction to the indigenous and contemporary arts of Africa, Oceania, and Native North America. In these vast locales of human culture, we will study how art provides concrete conceptual and visual structures around which social, political, cultural aesthetic and ritual institutions are constructed. The art object, imbued with several meanings, is essential to the human lifecycle, charged with political, economic and spiritual connotations and instrumental to rituals of birth, death and all the stages of transition in between. In such contexts, art operates within spaces of performance and individual art objects are imbued with multiple meanings. We will investigate the historical nature of different art traditions in these cultures and evaluate specific art forms like painting, sculpture, mural painting, textiles and decorative arts, body adornment, masquerade performances, royal/leadership arts, and sacred, secular and vernacular architecture.

GE: AREA F, WORLD CULTURES
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION

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6H   Survey: The Arts of Precolumbian America     MW   200-315   BUCHANAN 1930     Spivak

Visual Culture or "Art," that is to say architecture, sculpture and mural painting as well as textiles, metallurgy and ceramics, played a central and powerful role within the Precolumbian civilizations that produced them. Visual messages were encoded in the ways cities were built, stone and wood were carved, and leaders had themselves ornamented and buried. Using interdisciplinary methods, our goal will be to reconstruct (to the degree that is possible), the meaning and function of the visual arts in multiple, interlocking economic, political and sacred spheres. As an introduction to the ancient Americas, this course will focus on seven major cultures in Mesoamerica (Olmec, Teotihuacan, Maya, Aztec) and Andean South America (Chavín, Moche, and Inka).

GE: AREA F, WORLD CULTURES, WRITING
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION

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6J   Survey: Contemporary Architecture     MW   930-1045   BUCHANAN 1930     White

Global survey of architectural production in the twenty-first century. Emphasis on form and technology, as well as economic, sociopolitical context. Explores built form at a variety of scales (buildings, cities, virtual spaces) as well as the concept of a "contemporary."

GE: AREA F
ENROLLMENT BY DISCUSSION SECTION

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105O   The Global Middle Ages: Visual and Cultural Encounters in the Medieval Mediterranean     TR   930-1045   ARTS 1341     Badamo

Prerequisite: upper-division standing.

Focusing on the Mediterranean, this course considers visual manifestations of exchange. Its goal is to examine the complexity of religious, political, and visual interactions in the Middle Ages, a period that brought together diverse religious communities, generating both social frictions and new cultural forms. Students will study the dynamic interplay among Christian, Jewish, and Islamic visual cultures as they developed and coalesced through commerce, gift exchange, the reinterpretation of pre-existing forms, and the reuse of objects and spaces.

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105P   Introduction to Medieval Art and Architecture     TR   200-315   ARTS 1341     Badamo

Prerequisite: upper-division standing.

This course explores the soaring cathedrals, monstrous sculptures, and marvelous images that inspired The Lord of the Rings and Game of Thrones. Beginning with the fourth-century rise of Christian images and ending with the advent of print, it traces how images developed new roles — and reinvented old ones — over the course of the Middle Ages. Investigating architecture, sculpture, and manuscripts in their historical contexts, it asks why medieval objects look the way they do and how viewers saw them.

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113B   Seventeenth Century Art in Italy I     MW   1100-1215   ARTS 1341     Paul

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.
Not open to students who have completed History of Art & Architecture 113A.

Italian painting, sculpture, architecture, and urbanism from the late sixteenth to late seventeenth centuries examined in its cultural, political, and religious contexts, with emphasis on the relationship between the arts. Focus on the earlier seventeenth century, including the work of Caravaggio, Carracci, and the young Bernini.

GE: AREA F

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119E   Early Twentieth Century European Art, 1900 - 1945     MW   930-1045   ARTS 1341     Monahan

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

Introduction to the major movements of European modern art in the first half of the twentieth century. This course critically addresses the formation of avant-garde groups and movements in relation to political and social issues.

GE: AREA F

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120CC   Special Topics in Twentieth-Century Modern Art     TR   1230-145   ARTS 1341     McLemore
     Topic: Museums and History

Prerequisite: not open to freshman.
May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 12 units provided letter designations are different.

How do 20th century museums tell stories about the past through historical objects, written narratives, photography, performance, architecture, and art? How do national, community and curatorial politics shape these stories?

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121C   Twentieth-Century American Art: Modernism and Pluralism, 1900 - Present     MW   330-445   ARTS 1341     Garfinkle

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

American painting in the twentieth-century, from the advent of modernism to yesterday.

GE: AREA F

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130D   Pre-Columbian Art of South America     MW   500-615   ARTS 1341     Spivak

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

The architecture, sculpture, ceramics, textiles, and metalwork of the Andean civilizations from 3000 BCE to 1532 CE are examined within their archaeological and cultural contexts.

GE: AREA F, WORLD CULTURES

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133EE   Special Topics in Islamic Art     TR   1100-1215   ARTS 1341     Khoury
     Topic: Islam & Image

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.
May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 12 units provided letter designations are different.

What are Islam’s views toward images & where do we find these views? This course explores the gaps between the recent violence against historical sites and artifacts & old proclamations against idols by examining material, visual and textual evidence across centuries of Muslim presence in Iran, India, Turkey & the Arab world.

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134E   The Art of the Chinese Landscape     TR   500-615   ARTS 1341     Sturman

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

Chinese approaches to landscape as subject matter in art, with a focus on painting and garden architecture. The course begins with the immortality cult in the Han dynasty (206 BCE - CE 221) and ends with contemporary artists of the twentieth century.

GE: AREA F, WORLD CULTURES

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134J   Understanding Manga     MW   1230-145   ARTS 1341     Wattles

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.

This class will do close readings of manga (cartoons/comics/graphic novels by Japanese), considering examples from the 19th century to the present. We will analyze the visual design, narrative progression, and the word and image relationship. Historically, we will think about the shifting definition of manga through time and consider how politics, changing media, and globalization played a role in determining the form. Student discussion, presentations, and a paper required.

Previous knowledge of manga is welcomed (or more broadly Japan and Japanese). Counts for credit in EALCS.

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185AE   Special Topics in Art History     MW   200-315   ARTS 1341     Buono
     Topic: Art and its Environments in Brazil

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.
May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 12 units provided letter designations are different.

From the first moment of contact between Amerindians and Europeans in 1500 through the end of the colonial regime in 1822, Brazil’s nature has been variously seen as Amazonian paradise, as a resource-rich Atlantic forest, as “green hell.” Through such media as earthworks, featherwork, body arts, performance, landscape painting, sculpture, and architecture, this course examines the mediation of art and nature in Colonial Brazil. We will consider how this intersection of the cultural and the natural have shaped not only our understanding of Colonial Brazil, but have had a profound impact on eco- and ethno-political debates today.

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185TC   Special Topics in Art History     TR   330-445   ARTS 2622     Buono
     Topic: Transoceanic Visions: Art of the Portuguese Global Empire

Prerequisite: not open to freshmen.
May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 12 units provided letter designations are different.

In the early-modern period, Portugal launched the world’s first global empire, eventually encompassing West and East Africa, Brazil, India, Sri Lanka, China and Japan. Works of art (including architecture, painting, sculpture, printed images, maps and ceramics) and technological innovations (ship construction, navigational technology, printing) were crucial elements in constructing this new Lusophone, or Portuguese-speaking, World. This course explores the role that art played in projecting power, shaping identities, and both interlinking and transforming entire cultures and societies. We will conclude the course by briefly examining how artists from the many former colonies of Portugal use that artistic heritage to address the impact of globalism today.

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186Q   Seminar in Islamic Art and Architecture     W   1100-150   ARTS 2622     Khoury

Prerequisite: upper-division standing.
May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 8 units with different topic. Open only to History of Art & Architecture majors during Pass 1.

Advanced studies in Islamic art and architecture. Topics will vary. This course requires weekly readings and discussion, and the writing of a research seminar paper.

GE: WRITING

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186RW/282B   Seminar in Japanese Art     M   300-550   ARTS 2622     Wattles
     Topic: Patterns & Paste: Japanese Stencil Art, circa 1966

Prerequisite: upper-division standing.

This seminar is a museum practicum. Selected participants will work towards an exhibition scheduled for Fall 2018 at Santa Barbara Museum of Art (tentative title above). Activities include research and writing for the exhibition labels and catalogue, and imagining innovative activities for viewers. Art, art history and museum studies students given preference, but interested students of any major welcome.

Enrollment by add code only. Contact Professor Wattles for more information: mwattles@arthistory.ucsb.edu.

GE: WRITING

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282A   Topics on East Asian Art     F     900-1200     ARTS 2622     Sturman

Prerequisite: graduate standing.

Research on select problems on the arts of China, Japan, or Korea.

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282B/186RW   Topics of Japanese Art     M   300-550   ARTS 2622     Wattles
     Topic: Patterns & Paste: Japanese Stencil Art, circa 1966

Prerequisite: graduate standing.

This seminar is a museum practicum. Selected participants will work towards an exhibition scheduled for Fall 2018 at Santa Barbara Museum of Art (tentative title above). Activities include research and writing for the exhibition labels and catalogue, and imagining innovative activities for viewers. Art, art history and museum studies students given preference, but interested students of any discipline welcome.

Enrollment by add code only. Contact Professor Wattles for more information: mwattles@arthistory.ucsb.edu.

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296A   Reading Critical Theory and the Visual Arts     M   1100-150   ARTS 2622     Spieker
     Topic: Art and Literature and the Object, from 1960 to the Present

Prerequisite: graduate standing.
Same as course GER 270 and C LIT 252.

My seminar looks at post-1960 art and literature that eschews or even destroys objects — art that minimizes objecthood in favor of linguistic elaboration and/or performance or dance — from a decentered perspective. Taking its cue from the 1999 exhibition Global Conceptualism at the Queens Museum, we will deliberately approach such practices from the global margins — from Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union/Russia to Latin America, Japan, the USA and Western Europe — assuming, with Luis Chamnitzer, that each of these regions functioned “according to their own clock.” What ties these practices together, regardless of their heterogeneous regional origins, is the idea of dematerialization or de-objectification: the replacement of the aesthetic/consumer object with words, narrative, performance, or dance. The seminar should appeal to interested students in Comparative Literature, Art History, Art, and generally speaking, those interested in aesthetic ideas and the history of art and literature from the 1960s to the present.

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